Guest Post: 10 Tips to Life with Lupus

Lupus is a condition that causes your body’s and your immune system to fight against you 24/7. It can affect almost every part of your body including the heart, skin, kidneys, lungs, joints, blood cells, and even the brain. It is a chronic condition, it won’t go away, so once you’re diagnosed with Lupus, you have to learn to live your best life with it. The effects of lupus vary from person to person, sometimes being completely debilitating, sometimes just coming in waves, sometimes being minimally “visible.” All you can do is manage symptoms and make necessary changes to your lifestyle and stick to treatment, most will be able to live a happy life.


Here are ten tips to live a little better with lupus and make the best of this life:

  1. Don’t Compromise on Rest and Sleep
    Fatigue is a common symptom of lupus, which can be dealt with by maintaining a healthy sleep cycle and abstaining from overwork. Make adjustments to your bedroom to make slumber time as comfortable as possible. Do not consume any stimulants after sunset, in order to achieve7-9 hours of uninterrupted sleep at night.
  2. Exercise Daily
    Regular exercise boosts the immune system, which is why it is highly beneficial for everyone living with lupus. However, as lupus triggers increased fatigue and joint pain, do not opt for high impact workouts. Stick to lighter exercises, such as walking, cycling, and yoga.
  3. Quit smoking
    Smoking is injurious to the heart and lungs, which are already compromised in the case of lupus. If you want to prevent early onset of cardiovascular disease and lung problems, break the habit of smoking cigarettes and other stuff that could instigate charges for a drug crime.
  4. Avoid Drinking
    Many people having lupus suffer from kidney failure at a young age. Alcohol is very bad for the kidneys, especially if they are already in a vulnerable position. Alcohol can also react with certain medications prescribed to lupus patients, causing side effects or lowering efficacy.
  5. Keep Clean
    Since lupus makes us susceptible to infections and allergies, we need to be extra concerned with hygiene. Always carry sanitizer when you leave the house, refrain from touching contaminated services, and prefer meals prepared at home.
  6. Protect yourself from UV Rays
    Sensitivity towards the sun is another common symptom of lupus, so avoid going out during the day and consider yourself a vampire. If you have to go out in daylight, wear sunscreen with a minimum of 30 SPF and try to stick to shade. Extremely bright indoor lighting can also expose you to harmful UV rays, so fluorescent bulbs at home can be covered with a light shield that filters the damaging rays.
  7. Keep your Mental Health in Check
    Stressing out can set off and aggravate flares. A flare in lupus patients can be defined as an instance where regular symptoms suddenly get severe or worse than usual. You should indulge in activities that relax your mind and body. If you are experiencing anxiety or depression, psychotherapy is recommended to cope with it.
  8. Eat Healthy
    There is no restrictive or special diet for people living with lupus. You shall be fine as long as you eat well-balanced nutritious meals. Oily fish is particularly good for you, being rich in Omega-3 fatty acids that help combat inflammation. A Vitamin D and calcium supplement will surely benefit your bones and joints; also, avoid very spice food, as it may instigate irritation, heat, and development of ulcers.
  9. Try Alternative Therapies to manage Pain
    Acupuncture, yoga, tai chi, chiropractic techniques, biofeedback, and hot baths are a few alternative methods to alleviate pain. They will help you relax and cut back on pain killers.
  10. Join a Support Group
    It always helps to acknowledge that you are not in this alone. Look up lupus support groups in your area where you can meet other people facing the same challenges as you. You may gain valuable advice for managing symptoms and make a few good friends for life.
Continue reading Guest Post: 10 Tips to Life with Lupus

Into the COVID Holidays We Go

For as long as I can remember my mom, my aunt, my grandma and I have gone to craft shows together during November and December and done a huge amount of Christmas shopping. I love this tradition because of the time spent with my mom and the other women of the family but also because we support so many small business owners, we find fantastic, handmade gifts that our loved ones won’t be expecting and we support individuals who put such time and creativity and passion into every piece they are selling. 

We’ve entered what is obviously going to be a very unique, unprecedented holiday season. I think there is some nervous energy and anticipation because of all of the unknowns, but the holiday spirit will nonetheless take over as holiday music and movies flood our car radios and TV guides and suddenly pillsbury cookies with turkeys and christmas trees are next to the pumpkin pies in the featured aisles in the grocery store.

Since we’ve entered flu season the risk for COVID19 has obviously increased as well and we are all faced with questions like how do we celebrate the holidays this year? Is it safe for our extended family to gather? Or even to travel and get here in the first place? Are the school aged kids safe to be around the grandparents? How do you social distance or keep masks on when you’re gathering for Thanksgiving supper or Christmas morning gifts? 

What about black friday? Christmas shopping? Christmas church services? Baking day? All of your traditions that involve people, food, hugs and kisses…

Sadly, COVID19 will be playing part in our holiday happenings this year, but that doesn’t mean we won’t have opportunities to make it a beautiful, meaningful holiday season. It will be one of a kind, new territory for all – we know at least that much! 

Here’s the thing… for some of us, these aren’t new holiday complications. The COVID life isn’t so different from that of a chronic illness warrior who is sick to the extent of being homebound or even bedbound. We have always had to wear masks during flu season and avoid anyone who has been sick, even if that means skipping family gatherings or school/work. It can become an isolating time, you don’t get many visitors, it’s often just you and your caretakers, your family members, and your outings get as exciting as taking a drive on the back roads with your camera, capturing the sunset or if you’re really lucky, the bald eagle. 

So you can see how this time in quarantine has just amplified that spoonie lifestyle, and heightened the isolation, as even going to the doctors office is risky,   going to 7-11 to get a drink on the way home, running to the dollar store to get items for packages, heck, even mailing the packages is on the no list for me now. (Wear your masks, please. )

Thanksgiving can be a tough holiday to feel really involved in, really comfortable going to as a gastroparesis warrior/tubie. It is all food, the air filled with the smells of meat and pie, and there are so many loud kitchen sounds and multiple conversations going at once, lots of beautiful laughter, and oh so many forks tapping on the fine china around the table. When you are sitting at the table but are not partaking in the meal it’s hard not to become hypersensitive to all of the little noises and to be overwhelmed keep up with the conversation when you really just want to burst. Or eat. Or go in another room and just be. 

It can be difficult to adjust to being in a setting like that. For me it’s not about people eating in front of me, it’s more that it’s a holiday tradition that is suddenly stolen from you, it’s a bit different than a normal family meal or hanging out with your friends while they have a snack or whatever. This is something the whole family is doing, it’s more than a meal, it’s a celebration and a tradition, memories made, memories being talked about, but when you feel so sick and you can’t sit there any longer without getting sick, you learn to seperate yourself. 

Thanksgiving is a time to spread awareness, to encourage others to be thankful for something that everyone does all the time, so many times a day in so many settings without a thought, that has been taken from so many of us – the ability to enjoy food. The ability to be independent, to work and go to school, to live on our own…on thanksgiving, though, mostly focus on the eating :). I always encourage my readers to mention this to their family and friends on thanksgiving or any other time it pops into their minds, even just having froyo with friends or at lunch at school, whenever and wherever, take advantage of it and remind people that even the most natural parts of life can be taken out of nowhere. 

COVID19 is (hopefully) something we won’t have to alter our lives for forever. They are working hard to find a vaccine, to find an answer to get us back to real life and out of global crisis. Thank god. But for those of us with chronic conditions, we will continue having to alter holiday traditions, continue feeling out of place at times, continue wearing masks during flu season; our lives were complicated in these ways before COVID and they will be this way post COVID, but this year you have gotten a taste of our situation, and that’s something. 

Honor our struggle by not taking these limitations for granted when your COVID experience comes to a close.

A Day in the Life of a Migraineur

A guest post by John Martinez with Axon Optics…

A day in the life of a migraineur is not a normal day. It’s like a day of playing dodgeball, but if you get hit, you have to call out of work and live with head-splitting pain. Migraine triggers can appear at any time, and the migraine can rear its ugly head on a moment’s notice. 

Living with migraines can sometimes feel like going on vacation, without any of the relaxation of going on a vacation. You need to check the weather, make sure you’ve packed everything you need, and always have a backup plan in case things go south. 

If you have a friend or family member that experiences migraines, this is worth a read. A day in the life of a migraineur revolves around migraines: avoiding them, treating them, and explaining them to others. 

Avoiding Migraine Triggers 

A day in the life of a migraineur often includes dodging triggers. The list of migraine triggers goes on as long as a migraine itself. Any of the following could also cause a head-splitting migraine:

  • Hormonal changes 
  • Changes in the weather
  • Stress 
  • Certain levels of physical activity
  • Strong smells
  • Bright lights
  • Loud music 
  • Dietary changes 
  • Caffeine or alcohol 

 

A day in the life of a migraineur may include turning down an invitation to happy hour, staying inside when they want to go outside, or trying to change an event to a more quiet and low-key location. All the while, the migraineur is attempting to stay calm, because too much stress may just bring on the migraine they are trying to avoid. 

Throughout the day, migraineurs may be recording their diet and activities in order to discover and control their triggers. Not all people with migraines are triggered by the same things – the process of pinpointing triggers and then avoiding them can take up an entire block of a migraineur’s day. 

What’s In A Migraineur’s Purse? 

It’s not always easy to dodge these triggers; how are you supposed to know when a change in barometric pressure is going to cause numbness and pain throughout your entire body?  

If migraineurs can’t avoid migraine triggers, they will have to treat migraine symptoms. This means carrying a bag with everything they need to deal with migraines. 

Medication 

Over-the-counter medications offer some of the quickest relief to migraines. It’s always good to have your painkiller of choice on hand when symptoms start to arise. Over the counter medications include Aleve/naproxen, Excedrin Migraine, ibuprofen, and Motrin migraine. 

For those of us who have severe, chronic migraines there are also prescription medications that you can take when you have a migraine coming on, imitrex being the most commonly used. There are quite a few options for daily medications and even some shots that are supposed to work for a month at a time, but these are new and not always covered by insurance, like any other med, they don’t work for everyone.

Hormonal medications may also help to regulate migraines – but this is not applicable to everyone. Female migraineurs should talk to their doctor about taking contraceptives or other hormonal medication if they have migraines. 

A Cold or Hot Compress 

This lifesaver can also provide relief in a pinch. Cold or hot compresses against the back of the neck or on the forehead can help to numb some of the excruciating pain of a migraine. Unfortunately, it won’t treat blurry vision or other types of numbness. 

Sunglasses

I recommend FL-41 Glasses specifically!

Migraine glasses, also known as FL-41 glasses, have begun to give a lot of migraineurs hope. These rose-tinted glasses have been crafted to block out rays that trigger photophobia (sensitivity to light.) They can be worn indoors or outdoors. Migraineurs who don’t enjoy wearing glasses can order FL-41 contact lenses.

If you have ever experienced photophobia, you probably get significant relief by wearing sunglasses indoors. However, research shows that over time, it can make your light sensitivity WORSE. Maybe too much of a good thing really can be bad? If you want more information on this, check out, “Why Wearing Sunglasses Inside is a Bad Idea”   by John Martinez at Axon Optics.

Caffeine – coffee, coke, etc.

Like hormonal medication, caffeine can either cause migraines or treat it. A small can of cold brew or a soda sometimes helps migraine patients, but this is not a widely successful trick and is definitely not a long term answer. 

The Dark

Sometimes nothing helps with a migraine and you are stuck laying in bed in the dark, wishing away the pain and nausea and whatever else comes along with your migraine, everyone has their own “aura” or mix of symptoms – light sensitivity and sound sensitivity are some of the most brutal triggers, so stepping out of your cave, trying to turn on a light to focus on a task, or even just looking at your iPad to Netflix your migraine away can cause a massive wave of killer discomforts of all kind.

Eye masks/sleep masks and ear plugs are your friend. Noise machines with peaceful background sounds like fans, white noise, rain, etc. can also help block out the more painful noises and give your brain something to focus on that ins’t “dangerous.”

Support

Most importantly, don’t fight alone, except when you’re mid-migraine and can’t stand even the smallest of noises.

Whether you find your support through religion, family or friends, your dog, or an inspirational playlist on your phone, it is important to have something that helps you stay positive and hopeful. There are also support networks on facebook and other social media sites that can make a big difference. Of course, having a supportive doctor is also very important, so keep that number in your wallet, too.

…But Don’t Take Our Word For It 

Every migraineur has a different experience. While some people feel like an ice pick is piercing their temple, other people experience numb fingers and blurry vision. (These are real quotes, by the way.) Some people may experience symptoms for mere minutes, others, for hours or even days.

Whatever it feels like, it doesn’t just feel like “a headache.” Lucky for most, you won’t ever have to feel this pain, but part of being a migraineur involves telling people that migraines are not just headaches, that they are serious, and that they need more awareness, more research, and more treatment options, much like any other chronic, misunderstood illness.

 

Guest blogger John Martinez, in association with Axon Optics, edited / posted by Positively Rachel as an awareness post for chronic migraines

Thank you, John for sharing with us, as always I am excited and grateful to have a guest blogger!

If you want to read more about migraines and how they affect daily life, you can check out my own work on a previous post, “Chronic Migraines: More Than Just a Headache” or “Kids Get Migraines, Too!”.

Strength for All; A NTCP Shirt Fundraiser

In October of 2017 I had my GJtube surgically changed into two separate tubes – a jtube and a gtube – after months of tube trouble due to my severe dysmotility throughout my GI tract. This surgery was insanely painful due to complications brought on due to my EDS, so my recovery was long painful, and during that time I relied on my parents for EVERYTHING. I couldn’t sit up in bed on my own, couldn’t walk, shower, brush my hair, or seemingly do anything else because all of these movements require abdominal contractions/tension and every time that happened I was in excruciating pain.

It was during that time that I began thinking about how lucky I was to have my 24/7 support team who were there for me always, no matter what, no complaining, and I just couldn’t bear the thought of anyone going through this alone, so I decided to be there for every tubie I could. Chronic illnesses are one of those “find out who your real friends are” situations and it can be brutal and shocking seeing who it is who puts the effort in, my goal is to step up and be that person when I can, but also to encourage others to do the same; so two years and lots of work later, over 300 packages have been sent out to first time tubies. 

To celebrate this milestone we’ve started a shirt fundraiser to raise money to contribute to Newbie Tubie Care Packages! 

Living with chronic illnesses or other conditions that cause one to be unable to eat enough to sustain themselves on their own and cause the need for a feeding tube is incredibly challenging, and that’s a massive understatement. Imagine life without your favorite foods , without the ability to go out for ice cream or coffee or a drink with friends, not sitting around the table and eating thanksgiving with your loved ones, having to come up with options not involving food for social gatherings or first dates, and explaining to people why you aren’t eating or what that little knobby thing on your tummy is.

Feeding tubes require incredible strength and self awareness, they are life changing, but they are nothing to be ashamed of, they are a gift that gives life back to more people than you would ever imagine – young and old, boys and girls, and due to so many different causes or conditions, feeding tubes are so much more than just a life sustaining piece of plastic, so join us in spreading awareness and celebrating year 2 of Newbie Tubies as well as the gift that so many of us are given through feeding tubes – the gift of nutrition, energy, and a life we may not have had without them.

Whether you’re a tubie or not, purchasing a shirt shows your support and love for tubies and contributes to our care package program that sends packages (free of cost) to first time tubies. No matter where your strength comes from, these shirts represent that strength.

We run on donations and these shirts are super cute, so it’s a win-win! You do not have to be a tubie to be Tubie Strong!  Purchase a shirt for yourself and wear it proudly, no shame, just strength and power in your self and appreciation for the gifts we often take for granted.

Thank you so much <3

*Link below! Currently open until Nov. 21st.*

**SHOP HERE!**

you can also donate to PayPal @ rajinone@aol.com or check out or wishlists on Amazon or Etsy!

Love & Gratitude,

Positively Rachel

Newbie Tubies turns Two!

In November we will hit our 2 year mark, I cannot believe it! We will also have sent out OVER THREE HUNDRED PACKAGES at that time! We have already had over 300 applications sent in and have filled at least 75% of those, how incredible is that? 

Unfortunately right now, Newbie Tubies has no remaining funds for shipping boxes or purchasing the extra items that aren’t donated, so in order to continue as we hope to, we need YOUR help to get there. 

We’ve had some incredibly generous donors who send us tubie pads, heating pads, supply bags, and other tubie products and we have shopping lists for amazon and etsy for easy online shopping as well as shopping guides for inexpensive items from target, walmart, & fabulous dollar store finds, but none of that covers the $14 shipping cost that each box costs, and I simply can’t afford to pay out of pocket for any more boxes.

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There are so many ways we can raise money, but I cannot do it alone! 

ALL of my artwork profits go towards shipping costs, so check out the shopping site as well as my facebook page to see the artwork that is available and supports this project! There are also vinyl bags, shirts, onesies, and decals that are made to support the project as well! I take commission for both paintings and vinyl so email me or message me if you have an order!

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True amazement and joy when the littles get a buddy, this single toy helps them feel confident and less “different” from others.

We hope to do a shirt fundraiser, so keep an eye out for that as well as for an upcoming raffle! Share our page and these posts so we can get as much attention as possible, every tiny bit helps.

If you are a recipient of a package share a post about what Newbie Tubies means to you, how it helped you and why it’s a cause to donate to. Hearing personal testimomy about what we do and why and first hand experience about the impact it makes can go far, so share that on your social media pages, email it to your doctors or family members and have them share it – let’s MAKE THIS HAPPEN TOGETHER! 

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My first package sent! Now I’ve sent over 20!

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A newbie tube with her matching, tube fed hedgehog!

I hate asking for monetary donations, but right now, I have to do so if I want to send out any more packages. If you have fundraising ideas or are interested in helping out in any way, I’m all ears. 

Thank you so much for reading, sharing, and helping in any way you can. We truly appreciate every one of you and you are making a difference for so many.

 

 

Information for donating and contact information:

Amazon wishlist: https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/1J7LHVRD4V3A6?ref_=wl_share

Paypal: rajinone@aol.com

Facebook: Newbie Tubie Care Packages // Positively Rachel

IG: newbietubies // positivelyrachels_art

Email: positivelyrachel101@gmail.com

 

Mindful Impact

Mindfulness. It is just amazing how big of an impact our thoughts can have on our bodies, on our ability to heal. It’s important that you fill your mind with optimistic or positive, healthy thoughts and your life with all of the things that have always brought you joy, all of your hobbies, and the people who put a smile on your face.

Today’s technologies allow for incredible connections; there is a huge online presence of “spoonies” (as we call ourselves) all over instagram and facebook, both individual pages and group pages! This resource is a HUGE gift to those of us who suffer from severe illnesses that leave us homebound or bed bound with little to no social interaction, but there are cons to this as well.

When you surround yourself with individuals who are sick, and you are sick and have been for a long time, it begins to feel normal. You start to forget what it feels like to be healthy, to be a functional, productive person. When you start to feel that way you know it’s time to reevaluate your perspective, remind yourself of what makes you feel like YOU. Not sick you, not healthy you, but YOU.

Be mindful, know your limits physically and mentally. Will all of these posts from other sick chicks –  some of them trending towards competitive over who is worse off, some who seem to thrive off of the attention from being sick – make you focus too much on the sickness? Does life revolve around illness? Because it doesn’t have to; no matter how sick you are, you are more than your illness.

There’s a lot more to mindfulness than this, but it’s a start. I encourage you all to focus not on your illnesses, not on symptoms and treatments and bad doctor visits, not of scary unknowns and dooming diagnoses, but on all of the aspects of your life that were there before illnesses, that exist independently from illness, that bring you simple pleasure, joy, distraction, love. Positivity. Light.

When Life Gives You Limes

People often use the expression, “when life gives you lemons” when things aren’t going quite right, you’re likely familiar with the phrase? Well, humor me as I explain why I’d like to adapt the statement to, “when life gives you limes.”

In my opinion, lemons are tasty and you can do so much with them, many options being super simple! For example, of course you can make lemonade, then there is lemon cake, lemon bread, lemon cookies, pie, and more! I mean lemons are great for tea, detoxing, or simply put in your water. Lemons are just so handy, but limes? Limes are a little bit more complicated, they’re slightly more sour and although you can use them in drinks and recipes, it’s not quite as common, kind of like chronic illnesses – complex and uncommon.

That said, I have quite a few limes in my life. I’ve been diagnosed with over 10 chronic illnesses, a handful of which are seriously debilitating and progressive. I’ve had to take medical leave from the school of my dreams, now having watched my classmates graduate without me, and put my future goals on hold. Because of my symptoms– mostly nausea, pain, and fatigue– most days I am not even able to leave home and I spend majority of my time in my bed resting and sleeping.

I have new limes thrown at me every time a doctor gives me a new diagnosis, every time a treatment doesn’t work, and every time I wake up feeling worse than I did the day before. However, I’ve learned to take these limes and use them to help me find all of the gifts in life, all of the things that I am so thankful for. When you’re given challenges, sour moments, it really teaches you to be so much more thankful for every little moment or object that makes you feel joy.

Some of the sweet things in my life that regularly help me get through the sour moments include my dogs, Baxter & Dexter, my family, good music, and my online support network. There are also little gifts day to day like a 75 degree day, a special visitor or getting something in the mail, being able to take a walk, an Epsom salt bath, taking a drive and seeing pretty scenery, etc. Lots of small things bring me joy, and I am so appreciative of every happy moment I am given.

I’ve had a lot of curveball limes recently, broken tubes, line infections, flare ups of pain and nausea, exhaustion, and doctor troubles to name a few, but I’ve learned to put up walls that keep all of this from affecting me too much, only allowing through the smallest amounts of stress or worry possible – the last thing I need on top of my illness happenings? Extra limes.

Learning to filter out some of the extra stressors, even the smallest things you may hardly notice can make a big difference in the long run. Hold on to every happy moment, every simple pleasure, and let go of negative energy; hold no grudges, and never go to bed or leave your loved ones angry. Forgive, love, laugh, and remember not to waste precious time on trivial issues. When life gives you limes, take a moment to find your own sweet moments and happy thoughts, play your favorite song or cuddle with your dog, text your best friend or your mom, take time to express yourself, share your love and gratitude, spread the joy in random acts of kindness, random words of affection. Life is too short to be sour.

 

Adventures of Mummy & Her Little Tubie

I’m excited to share a post written by one of our Newbie Tubie Mamas who is the mama of a little tubie and agreed to share a bit of her journey with us! This is a great opportunity to read a bit about raising a tubie from the perspective of the mother…

“There were times I’d sit and wonder how the hell we were going to get through this, how can we live like this forever not being able to feed our baby who’s starving and also failing to thrive anyway so needs every bit of milk he can get.

Our little man is now 8 months and has all of his nutrition via a feeding tube. Some days your baby’s screaming for milk and you can’t feed him because you can’t get the right aspirate – this could take us hours. It does get easier I promise!

I’m very lucky my husband is amazing with our children. He’s definitely the more practical thinker and I go into full research mode and sit and think what if. I have managed to tone down the googling – my husband made me promise I’d only google it if the doctor had spoken about it or it was in one of his reports and that really does help. Your then looking at specific information rather than a whole load of case stories of children who have completely different medical histories. I do find that being prepared helps my mental health, but only if I’m preparing for the real thing, not something from google that ends up being way far off from what’s really going on.

It also helps that he’s a very hands on Dad so I know when I’m in hospital with our youngest that the others are safe and happy at home with their Dad who also manages to keep the house going while I’m away. They spend lots of time visiting us because at the moment they’d rather be with us at the hospital but when the time comes that they don’t want to do that anymore we will be respectful of this and put other plans in place.

Our children have been amazing, they find it really tough and it’s so important to remember that this isn’t easy on them, either. They’re young, but they see the complexity, they see when we are upset, they want to know, so we tell them what’s happening but also try and keep their lives as normal as you can. We try and make sure they get to all their clubs, they have friends for tea or we get them on days out as we would have done before.

Siblings are a great gift to our tubie, but we have to make sure that each child feels loved, appreciated, and individually important to us and to everyone. Each one makes a huge difference, is an inspiration, a source of strength and light and joy.

During feeds it can be difficult to pick your baby up without messing up the pump, kinking the tubing, or making your baby uncomfortable from the feeds, and as caretakers, moms especially, all you want to do is hold that sweet baby! There are often extra steps when doing these basic, instinctual habits, and when you’re a parents, that can be extremely frustrating and disheartening. Eventually, the medical supplies falling out of all of your closets and the tasks that come with tubes and chronic illnesses become part of your daily routines, it all just becomes second nature – scary thought, right?

It’s all about finding the right mindset, but you first have to almost grieve the life you thought you were going to have with your new baby. I cried for hours that I would loose that bond by holding him to feed him; I can assure you I was worrying over nothing our bond is stronger than ever! We still get plenty of cuddle time and when he’s feeding I’ll often sit next to his cot and hold his hand, play peekaboo or tickle him. There are lots of opportunities for bonding you just have to look for them.

I woke up one day and realized this was our life and we’ve got two choices we get on with it, build our little man up and hope one day he stops aspirating or we sit and sulk about it which gets you absolutely nowhere! Life doesn’t stop for a feeding tube, feeding tubes allow life to get going again, it allows children to BE children, it is just another way to feed your little one.”

-Hayley Smith

If you have any interest in guest posting, I’m always happy to share different perspectives and pieces from fellow writers 🙂 Email me/contact me through the blog if you want to talk about it 🙂

 

Sponsor a Book for our Little Tubies

I grew up with two early childhood educators, so books have been a staple for me since day 1, and that is a true gift my parents gave me. Books help us learn about the world in a fun, visual, and age-appropriate /understandable way, teachings us the simplest of things like letters and animals to right and wrong, to all you can do when you grow up, and how to be the best YOU that YOU can be, whatever that means.

Books are part of what help us learn about new and different things we may come across, and it’s important to give children resources to help them be aware of all of life’s diversities and that being unique is never something to be ashamed of, so authors include all sorts of characters and situations in books that help prepare kids for life, even if the kids think it’s all just a story…. What about books for kids with illnesses? Children with wheel chairs, bald heads, or feeding tubes?

When I started Newbie Tubies I had a goal to help all of my “newbies” have all of the important information and to feel as supported as possible, and to learn love and acceptance for their new gadget and for themselves. Some people have a harder time than others with this, and that is completely fine, but sometimes you need to let those around you help you get to that point by letting them support you and accept you and your tube for you to see that your tube doesn’t change you, it just keeps you around…

Well, back to books, sometimes it can be hard for our littler tubies to adjust when they go to school and all of a sudden are thrown into a world where peers are eating lunch and bringing in cupcakes for birthdays and you’re no longer in the safety of your home, but both tubie and classmates start to see differences, even at a young, young age, and it’s time to bring in the books to help normalize tubes, to make all of the classmates learn through the avenue they know best – books.

For the same reasons, picture books about tubes can also be very beneficial for adult tubies who have young children or work with young children. Visual, audio, and hands on awareness and normalization is more than we can ask for, and starting young, starting by reading these books to the next generation is just awesome.

If you’re interested in sponsoring a book for our packages, we include one in each package we send to our little tubies and we appreciate every donation! I’m attaching the link as well as the list, so if you have a tubie of your own and want to buy a book, there are quite a few great options!

Our “Sponsor a Tubie Book” wish list on Amazon carries some FABULOUS tubie books for our young tubies! Click HERE to go straight to the list, the names of our most used books are listed below in case you shop elsewhere 🙂

 

BOOKS!

“The Adventures of Team Super Tubie”

Kristin Meyer

“Tubie Kids Like Me”

Annette Fournier

“When My Brother Got a G-Tube”

Jordan Tarbutton

“My Belly has Two Buttons: A Tubie Story

Meikele Lee

“Emma’s Special Tummy”

Paula

 

My Tubey Series by Rhiannon Merritt-Rubadue (full series on amazon!)

“My Tubey Goes to School:  A My Tubey Book”

Rhiannon Merritt-Rubadue

“There’s More Than One Way to Eat: A my Tubey Book”

Rhiannon Merritt-Rubadue

“My Tubey: A Day in the Life of a Tube Fed Girl”

Rhiannon Merritt-Rubadue

“My Tubey: A Day in the Life of a Tube Fed Boy”

Rhiannon Merritt-Rubadue

Chronic Illnesses: Who Knows?

In the past few months I’ve seen increased frequency and severity in my symptoms and even new symptoms coming to light. When I have flare ups or new issues I often become more aware of my current physical state, and ironically, while doing so, I usually think I’m better off until these harsh realizations, moments of brutality that shine a light on the fact that no, I’m not better, I’m actually worse, but I’ve just gotten used to being sick, used to this flare up that just never left, that became my new “normal.”

Though I’m used to high levels of pain, severe nausea, frequent migraines, fatigue, etc. when I wake up and have new symptoms or symptoms I’ve had before all of a sudden “amplified,” it can be super frustrating, discouraging – not to mention painful. But when these “flare ups” come about and decide to stick around for more than a day or two, the mind starts to wonder….

Is this a flare? Are these symptoms going to go back to “normal?” Is there something more serious going on?

Pain is a hard thing to talk about and understand because everyone has a different relationship with pain, everyone’s “scale” is their own – my 6 could be your 9 for example – and you can’t really know what anyone else’s is unless you’re living it. My pain has been a totally new phenomenon the last couple weeks, my body is searing, my head is killing me, it’s just relentless. This pain is different from my “normal” pain, though, so it’s kind of hard to compare them severity wise, it’s hard to simplify it to a word like “throbbing, stabbing, burning, etc.” or a number 1-10 – I’m in severe pain and discomfort all over my body and it won’t give me a break — I wish that were enough to figure out a way to help, right?

“What concerns me the most is the unknown….it is just too overwhelming to think about…”

When my symptoms cause me to be even more “disabled” than normal, when I can’t get up or out of the house for a week or more, I’m hardly able to be around others because of the pain and stimulation, and I’m sleeping excessively or unable to sleep at all, it can be hard to find motivation, hard to force yourself to get up and get going, doing something as simple as shower or change into fresh pjs…

“No one really explained to me the depth or the magnitude of that diagnosis, no one explained how serious and life changing this chronic illness can be….”

There are so many unknowns with chronic illnesses, and most of us learn all about that through personal experiences, not from doctors or even google doctor! Living with conditions that even doctors don’t know enough about can be scary, all of a sudden everything you know is just swept out from underneath you, you’re left with so little understanding and no control over your own body, your own life. This is all shocking, it’s devastating, and you have got to find a way to embrace it, conquer it, and grow right along side it, otherwise, it will break you through and through, not only physically, but mentally and emotionally, mind, body, and soul.