Chronic Illness Dictionary

New to the spoonie life? Are you the patient or a loved one/caretaker/friend trying to support a spoonie? We have a lot of chronic illness “lingo” that can be confusing to the “real world,” so I decided to create this list to help get some of these out there and easy to find 🙂 This list contains many of the common words and acronyms you will come across  but I’m sure I’m missing something! If you have other words/acronyms I missed, comment and I’ll add them in! I plan to do so as things pop into my mind, as well 🙂

And off we go!

  1. “Spoonie”- chronic illness patient; a term based on @TheSpoonTheory that aims to explain the level of fatigue we face as well as what simple, daily tasks can take so much energy from a “spoonie.”
  2. “Tubie” – a term used in the chronic illness world to talk about individuals who are tube fed; not an insult, we use it about ourselves and one another all the time.
  3. “Stoma” – the tube site, the area on your outer abdomen where the tube enters, and is used to keep it clean and comfortable as much as possible.
  4. “Feeds” – formula that goes through the feeding tube to sustain and nourish patients; “Time for feeds” is like “Time for supper!” except a lot less fun.
  5. Tubie Pads: similar to gauze but much cuter, used to help keep the tube site clean, healthy, and CUTE 😉

IMG_2763

Tubie pads donated by some of our VIP donors : @newbietubies @turkeytotcustoms @HomemadeTubieHappiness @DorkyLittleEtsyStore

  1. “Vent” – if you have a feeding tube that is in your stomach (gtube/gjtube/NG tube) you can “vent” it if you are nauseous or have air stuck in your gut (which doesn’t move). It is often done with a drain bag for gravity or a syringe for suction, which requires more caution – ick!
  2. A cental line ( hickman or port, picc line) – essentially a long term IV that is placed into a large blood vessel near the center of the body most often through your chest and ending at the heart; used for IV treatments like chemo or IVIG, TPN, medications, IV hydration, etc.
  3. Brain fog – cognitive dysfunction that comes with conditions like dysautonomia, ehlers danlos syndrome, fibromyalgia, etc. and causes severe problems with word finding, on the spot thought processing, short term memory problems and sometimes long term as well, lack of mental clarity and trouble holding conversations, etc. // People often say they feel that way too, that it’s normal when you’re tired, it happens as you age, etc., but if you felt the fog we feel as patients, you’d be very glad your fog is not what we experience.
  4. Motility (GI) – movement of the digestive system and its ability to move anything in there along with it throughout the GI tract. When there isn’t proper movement, undesirable symptoms can come up and you can be at risk for conditions like gastroparesis. Gastroenterologists who specialize in these conditions are called “motility specialists.”
  5. Flip/flipped – if you have a GJ tube  you can experience a “flipped” tube, this is when the j-arm comes up from the intestine and into the stomach, where it doesn’t belong. To fix this you have to have it rewired in IR.
  6. Tubie Friend” – a stuffed animal or a doll with medical devices to match your own, so feeding tubes, central lines, oxygen mask, etc.; these are incredibly comforting and meaningful for all ages.
  7. “Button tube” – low profile feeding tubes have an extension that can be removed, leaving only the “button” when you’re not using it! The other surgical tubes don’t have that option, and we usually call them “dangler” tubes or catheter tubes.26610760_10211000346221389_75216378_o.jpg

13. “leaker” – individuals with cerebrospinal fluid leaks

14. Zebra – a zebra is representative of rare diseases, sometimes patients refer to themselves and others with such conditions as zebras themselves

Acronyms you may come across:

NTCP: Newbie Tubie Care Packages

NP: Nurse Practitioner

PCP: Primary Care Physician

GP: Gastroparesis

EDS: Ehlers Danols Syndrome

POTS: Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome; a type of Dysautonomia

MCAS: Mast Cell Activation Syndrome

NPO: nothing by mouth, long term or short term, often just 24hrs/overnight before surgery or certain procedures such as tube replacements, or even for fasting blood work

TPN: total parenteral nutrition, nourishment coming straight from an IV bag into your central line in order to stay nourished; can be short term or long term and is used as a last resort for dysmotility/gastroparesis patients who can no longer tolerate oral intake or feeds into the jejunum.

 

Types of Tubes:

GJTube: through your stomach and into the intestines; has access to both stomch and intestines

Jtube: a feeding tube that enters straight into the intestine; most complex and serious surgery out of the 3 surgical options, mostly used for those of us with severe dysmotility not just in the stomach, but also through the lower GI tract – small and large intestines/colon/etc. – and hence cannot keep the j-arm of a GJ tube “down” due to the lack of movement/pull.

Gtube: a tube through the abdomen and into the stomach directly, no lower access

NJ/NG: tubes going through the nose instead of the gut; usually used for short-terTm help for babies, individuals hospitalized, etc. or trials for feeds before surgery for G/J/GJ surgery.

 

*If you have any suggestions for words/phrases I should add, let me know- I’m always happy to have opinions from others 🙂 *

xoxo

Rachel

 

 

 

 

Must Haves for Tubies: A Guide to All of Your Tubie Essentials

Preparing for your first feeding tube? Or just adjusting to life with tubes? Here are some tips about some tubie essentials!

**always talk to your doctors when changing/adapting any parts of your treatment plan, my posts are strictly personal experience/personal research– I am not a medical expert, aside from my years of illness 😉

Gauze and/or Tubie pads—

Gauze and tubie pads serve the same purpose, they keep the tube site (aka the stoma) clean and dry, soaking up all excess drainage and keeping all outside gunk away! Some tubies have more drainage or granulation tissue while others hardly have any at all after the stoma heals from surgery; if you have a lot of it, continuously, gauze is often (not always) the best option. Tubie pads are much cuter and don’t require tape, making them easier on the skin. Some people use both, many people develop a preference as to which one they use, but either is a solid option for keeping your stoma clean and “happy.”

 

Great places for tubie pads (& great donors for newbie tubies!):

Homemade Tubie Happiness (on Facebook or Etsy)

Tubie Whoobies (Facebook)

Dorky Little Etsy Store (Etsy)

 

Syringes

 You’ll use syringes every day, you have to flush during and after feeds to keep your tube from clogging and many tubies take medications through the tubes, using syringes.

You can get various sizes and types of syringes, anything from a 1-3ml syringe (not used for tubes as much as for central lines), to 10ml, 30ml, and 60ml syringes. Luer lock syringes have smaller tips that can have needles screwed into them; they work best for flushing water/feeds through and the smaller ones can push clogs through. Slip tip/luer slip syringes have longer tips that are better for medications as they allow the dissolved meds pass through easier and leave less behind.

Your home health company should provide syringes, but if they don’t have the kind you like or don’t give you enough, you can buy mass quantities for cheap prices online.

 

Qtips, clean wash clothes, natural soaps

Keeping the tube(s) clean and dry is SO important. Change the gauze multiple times a day and pay attention to the stoma—clean gently with a warm, wet qtip when changing the dressing and wash with a cloth & natural soaps during your showers/baths/etc.

Don’t leave excess blood or drainage on the skin, it can cause irritations, itching, or pain. Some drainage and blood is normal, though. It’s no reason to panic.

 

Tapes/adhesives

 There are many types of tapes and adhesive bandages, as you go along you’ll figure out which best suits you! Your infusion/home health company should provide you with tape, but if they don’t or you don’t like what they give you, there is tape in any pharmacy or any store that has a health section.

Paper tape, transpore, or medipore tape are two of the easiest on the skin, but paper tape doesn’t last as long or stick as well and it is not water proof. It may take some trial and error, but you will figure out which works best, and if you use tubie pads you won’t need as much tape!

You should get tape from your home health/infusion company, but if not you can find it online or at the pharmacy.

 

Stoma creams/ointments—

Your tube site, aka your stoma, may cause you discomfort on and off even when it has healed. There are a lot of options for ways to try and minimize discomfort. You should ask your doctor before changing any part of your treatment plan, but these are some options to talk about…

Itching? Hydrocortisone cream, Benadryl cream

Pain? Lidocaine ointment

Skin irritation, granulation tissue, or bile burn? Try granulotion, calmoseptine, sudocrem, or any other barrier cream your doctor recommend

All of these items can be found on Amazon, at a pharmacy, or from your doctor…

 

Tubie belts, button covers, and tube clips

Along with tubie pads, you can get tubie belts and button or port covers that are especially helpful for children with feeding tube. Belts and covers help keep the tubes still and in place while being used or while not being used so that kids are less likely to mess with/pull on their tubes and cause harm to their tubes or themselves

The tubie clips help keep the extra tubing from dragging or getting caught on things when you are feeding on the go. These clips work well with backpacks and/or IV poles, whatever suits you. They’re cute and simple but can save you from yanking your tube out by accidentally stepping on it or getting it caught while moving around.

All of these items can be found on Etsy, a few of the best shops to find these?

Tubie clips: Crafting for a Cure Co. (They support Newbie tubies with their sales!)

Belts: Kangarootique (Etsy)

Heating pads

Heating pads help with pain, nausea, bloating, and so much more. You can get electric heating pads or microwavable ones. They come in all shapes, sizes, and patterns and you can get them anywhere– amazon, walmart, any pharmacy, or etsy.

One of my favorite Etsy shops and one of Newbie Tubies largest donors: Divine Comfort Rice Pks

Tubie Awareness Gear:

 Be loud & proud about being a tubie; there is no shame in having a feeding tube. There are so many cute shirts, bags, and accessories that help being a tubie be a little more glamorous. Don’t be afraid to let others know about your tube, awareness and confidence are important, and you never know who else may be out there with a tube hidden under their shirt, too?

A few places to find cute tubie apparel:

Tubie Love Gear: http://feedingtubeawareness.bigcartel.com/

Newbie Tubies: instagram @ newbietubies and/or positivelyrachel.com

 

Hopefully this information was helpful! For more, check out our tips list or visit my good friend, Carolanne’s blog, here for more information on tubie products!