IVIG Round 5 & Lots to Consider

Yesterday was round 5 of IVIG (Intravenous immunoglobulin). I’d love to say this was my miracle round and I woke up ready for a huge stack of pancakes or a burger and fries at ihob, but sadly, no pancakes, and definitely no burgers on my menu anytime soon.
 
I had IVIG yesterday (tuesday) at noon; I wasn’t feeling well & I slept through majority of the 2 1/2 hour infusion, so it went pretty quickly. When we finished, I was already experiencing side effects like low grade fevers, extreme fatigue, brain fog, pain, nausea, etc. When my nurse left and I had gotten settled, I slept for four more hours; Mom and Baxter woke me up around 7pm. I got up and took a short walk to get up and moving, out of bed for a bit and get some fresh air. I was asleep again before 9pm but continued to wake up every 4 hours as my pain and nausea medications wore off.
 
Today I’m still exhausted and experiencing a lot of elevated symptoms; by this I mean I am experiencing symptoms similar to my usual pain/nausea/migraine/weakness/etc, but they are kicked up a few notches and much less respondent to my meds.
 
I’m working hard to stay positive and mindful of both body and mind, and I have a long list of things I’d love to accomplish– artwork, tasks for my package project, blog posts/updates, outreach to volunteers and donors, thank you cards, etc.– but my body is telling me in many ways that I need to slow down and remember that it’s okay if I only get one thing done today, it’s okay if all I can do is sleep and recover. I’m doing my best, and there’s nothing more important than my health– or at least that’s what I tell my newbie tubies in their tip lists, so I guess I have to believe it and try it if I’m going to be preaching about it to others…:) 
 
Having a body & mind that are on different pages can be really challenging, but I am constantly learning and adapting as both my body and mind continue to change, often on their own volition.
I hope to see some of my specialists this month so we can determine what the best plan for moving forward is. More IVIG? No more IVIG? Are there other treatment options, or are we back to “keep you comfortable”? It’s all up in the air at this point, but honestly, I just want peace and as much normality as I can get. I don’t want to be stuck by more needles, put in MRI tubes, traveling huge distances to see doctors who spend 15 minutes with me only to tell me the same things I’ve heard before… “complicated” or “medical mystery” followed with, “manage the symptoms” and “keep you comfortable.”
There are no certainties in life, so take advantage of every moment you can, that is exactly what I aim to do.

Battling Gastroparesis: Happy Awareness Month!

In December of 2013 I was diagnosed with gastroparesis. Like majority of people, I had no idea what that was or what the diagnosis meant for my future.

When I got my diagnosis I was given minimal information about the condition, and because I didn’t know what it was back then, I didn’t know I wasn’t getting the full picture. I was told I had delayed movement in my stomach, it wasn’t emptying food like it should be. They told me gastroparesis is a chronic condition but since mine is what they call “idiopathic” or without findable cause, it was likely post-viral and would go away within a year or 18 months.

This discussion, my original gastroparesis diagnosis, lasted only minutes, and I was left to figure out most of it on my own. My parents and I left that hospital thinking I just had to get through this flare up and then it would hopefully go away for good. I had no idea on that day 4 years ago just how much gastroparesis was going to change my life.

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Some more info about GP– symptoms especially! And yes, that is my tube and a donut tubie pad!

Since my diagnosis in 2013, I have had countless tests and tried endless treatments, medications, diets, and therapies. Gastroparesis is extremely difficult to treat and there is no cure. In 2016 we found out that my dysmotility (movement disorder) had moved into my intestine and colon as well, so that became a major complication. Luckily at this point my parents and I had become experts on my conditions; after my original diagnosis we started to learn how to do our own research, we joined online support communities, and we went to see specialists who could give us more information about my conditions and prognoses as I was diagnosed with more conditions down the road.

The journey you go through when living with gastroparesis and generalized dysmotility is extremely taxing on both your body and mind; it’s exhausting and disappointing to try and try again and often get little to no relief. But, we have to keep trying in hopes that one day we will find the right treatment and hopefully a cure.

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As part of awareness month, I want to give you a glimpse at what it’s like going through testing and treatment with gastroparesis, so I’m going to list some of the tests, procedures, and treatments I’ve tried over my time with GP.

I was originally diagnosed with an Upper GI series, an endoscopy, and a 90 minute gastric emptying scan. Since then, I’ve had 3 more 4 hour emptying scans, multiple endoscopies, countless EKGs, lots of ultrasounds, endless x-rays, a breath test (SIBO), esophageal manometry, anal manometry, smart pill test, CT scans, MRIs, and so much more. And these are only the tests that have to do with GP—not my other conditions.

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I’ve tried physical therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, acupuncture, dry needling, chiropractors, and essential oils. I try keeping up with walking and core strength and I keep a positive mind set—no one can tell me I’m sick because I’m depressed! 😉 I’ve even read mindfulness books and watched documentaries on how to “heal your body,” although I wasn’t 100% sure about that one!

When I was able to eat, I’ve also tried a lot of diet adaptation. I was on the BRATS diet, low FODMAP diet, gluten free, dairy free, a gastroparesis diet, a liquid diet more than once, and I’ve been on both TPN and tube feeds. As of now I am completely dependent on my feeding tube for nutrition and my port for IV fluids daily.

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I stared with a picc line for TPN, then I had an NJ tube for a trial run with tube feeds before quickly deciding to have a GJ tube placed surgically in March of 2015. Since then, I’ve had my tube changed out over 26 times in IR due to either clogs, having it flipped into my stomach, or just needing a new tube (every 3-5 months). I also had a port a cath placed in August of 2016 and have that accessed 24/7 for fluids and nausea medication.

I won’t even list all of the medications I’ve tried because that’s just a ridiculous number and I don’t think you or I have the attention span for that. But you name a motility agent, a nausea med, a non FDA approved trial drug for GP, or pretty much anything used to control symptoms or promote motility or hunger and I’ve almost definitely either tried it or discussed it with my doctors and ruled it out as an option.

 

Over these (almost) four years I went from being able to manage my symptoms with a specialized diet and nausea medications to not being able to eat at all. Gastroparesis and generalized dysmotility are cruel illnesses, and paired with my genetic condition, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, they’re relentless and grievous. My condition has progressed to a very serious level and I’ve tried most of the options available to me.

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Learning to embrace my medical devices 🙂 there should be no shame or shyness towards life saving devices like tubes and central lines!

Almost a year ago I saw my motility specialist at Cleveland Clinic, a man who is considered to be the best of the best, and he gave me three options. We’ve ruled it down to one option, but sadly insurance isn’t thrilled with it. 9 months later and we are still fighting for it. But we won’t give up. Gastroparesis won’t win this fight.

Happy Awareness Month! Keep your eyes out for more posts from me and others as we try to spread awareness and work our way towards a much needed cure!

Xoxo

R