Recovery: The Real Challenge with Surgery

The past two weeks have been even more challenging than my “normal” for both my body and my mind. I had surgery two weeks ago to place a new/additional feeding tube and we ran into some challenges and now I am trying to heal and recover.

I’ve had to spend more time in bed since getting home from my surgery because I’ve been unable to move much on my own. For the first week I couldn’t sit up, stand, walk, sit down, go to the bathroom, brush my hair, or do anything for myself. Being 100% dependent on other people is really hard, regardless of the fact that I was already disabled and very dependent on my parents for so much even prior to surgery.

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Kevin needs his new tube placed!
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Baxter alerting me.

I have to admit that the first week or so post- surgery is all a blur. There was lots of pain, many doctors, a painful car ride home (or two), a lot of sleeping, medications, ambulance, pain, another ambulance, an awful ER, pain…. But what I do remember is that both of my parents were right there by my side the whole time. There was never any talk of hiring a nurse to do the hard work or asking another family member or close friend to come help so my parents could go back to work. Every day I had at least one if not both of my parents there taking care of me, no complaints or mention of using up their sick days.

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3 tubes?!

For the first many days I slept 20+ hours a day with the help of pain medication, nausea medication, and sedatives, which all together helped make me more comfortable. After my ER trip on Monday/Tuesday I stopped taking the heavy pain medications because they delay gastric emptying so I also stopped sleeping and instead started having major insomnia again. By Wednesday/Thursday I was starting to walk on my own and eventually getting out of bed by myself, too. Although I run out of energy quickly and my pain levels are still severe, every step forward is worth a celebration.

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Our one and only trick or treater 🙂 My favorite visitor!
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Always blessed and spoiled by my parents’ coworkers!

Having such a supportive and involved family made all the difference for me; I didn’t have to worry about keeping up with meds or finding a good nurse or anything because my parents and sister were on 24/7 “Rachel Duty” for as long as I needed them. We also have an incredible community that supports me by sending cards, flowers, and gifts but they also support my parents at work and through facebook and texts/calls of support and well wishes. Being the parents and care takers of a young adult as sick as I am is no easy task and it’s extremely important to have that support.

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Mom sleeping in the ER.

Surgery is tough, but recovery is hell. Waking up each morning in major pain and knowing it’s not going away isn’t easy on anyone physically or mentally, but each small improvement or sign of progress gives me hope. Life is precious and every day that your body is functional and pain free is a gift; I encourage you to take advantage of every day and live life to the fullest, always follow your heart and do more of what makes you happy. Find joy in every day.

Xoxo

Why I Continue to Avoid TPN as a Young Gastroparesis and Generalized Dysmotility Patient

I’m about to hit my 3 year mark of being tube fed. I never would have imagined that I would be 21 and fed through a tube in my gut, but it isn’t my last choice as far as alternative nutrition options go.

I’ve been asked and offered many times to go (back) on TPN, or total parenteral nutrition, which is nutrition that goes straight into your veins. This option gives you full nutrition—protein, fats, vitamins, etc—and can be tailored to your exact needs.

Because my intestines and colon are delayed (they don’t process food or feeds at a “normal” rate), I don’t get in enough feeds to meet my calorie goals and I haven’t been able to gain back any weight. My BMI is considered extremely low and some of my doctors would really like me to go back on TPN. For those who don’t know much about TPN and for those who have never had to make the choices I have, I’m going to try to explain to you why I – as well as many of the other girls in the same situation—want to avoid TPN for as long as possible.

Although TPN is complete nutrition, and it probably sounds like a great option to many of you reading, it comes with many risks. TPN requires you to have a central line or a long term IV that goes deep into a large vein and then straight to your heart. These can get infected easily and lead to sepsis, which if not caught in time can be life threatening.

While tube feeding is much more natural and forces your GI tract to at least try to function, TPN leaves the GI tract to shut down completely. For someone with dysmotility (lack of movement), this can mean there is little to no chance of returning to tube feeding or eating if another treatment option becomes available after they start TPN.

TPN also puts you at a higher risk for glucose abnormalities and liver dysfunction. The damage to the liver can be so serious it can cause you to be unable to run TPN or even require a transplant if not caught in time. While on TPN, you are required to do weekly blood work, blood sugar monitoring, and weigh ins. TPN can also cause volume overload, metabolic bone disease, and reactions to lipids (fats) such as nausea, headache, back pain, sweating, and dizziness.

So there are many, many undesired side effects from TPN. But aside from side effects, TPN is scary because for those of us with gastroparesis and intestinal dysmotility, TPN is our last option. To go on TPN means to admit that our intestines are no longer functional enough even just for tube feeds. It means we can’t eat, we can’t tube feed, and we may not return to either.

Yes, some people go on TPN and come off of it able to tube feed or even eat again. Some people only use TPN to supplement their tube feeds or oral intake. Everyone’s case is different and TPN helps so many people live a more “normal” life because it does provide full nutrition; it can boost your energy and help you regain strength and muscle that is lost from malnutrition. TPN saves the lives of many starving patients with gastroparesis and generalized intestinal dysmotility.

That said, it doesn’t make it any less scary. Losing the ability to eat is one of the most confusing and complicated things you can imagine. Going from eating orally to being fed through a tube is one of the strangest and hardest adjustments I’ve had to make, but knowing I could lose the ability to feed even through a tube in my gut is even harder to accept.

TPN is a miracle for so many people, but it is also a nightmare for many of us. It’s what can help us live, but also what can put our lives at risk. I’ve been on TPN before, and I fight my body (and sometimes my doctors) every day not to go back to it. You can’t understand what it’s like to go through this until you’ve been the patient, but I hope that everyone—doctors, nurses, family member, friends—can try to understand how hard it is on the patient to make these decisions and all someone needs during that time is support and love.