Into the COVID Holidays We Go

For as long as I can remember my mom, my aunt, my grandma and I have gone to craft shows together during November and December and done a huge amount of Christmas shopping. I love this tradition because of the time spent with my mom and the other women of the family but also because we support so many small business owners, we find fantastic, handmade gifts that our loved ones won’t be expecting and we support individuals who put such time and creativity and passion into every piece they are selling. 

We’ve entered what is obviously going to be a very unique, unprecedented holiday season. I think there is some nervous energy and anticipation because of all of the unknowns, but the holiday spirit will nonetheless take over as holiday music and movies flood our car radios and TV guides and suddenly pillsbury cookies with turkeys and christmas trees are next to the pumpkin pies in the featured aisles in the grocery store.

Since we’ve entered flu season the risk for COVID19 has obviously increased as well and we are all faced with questions like how do we celebrate the holidays this year? Is it safe for our extended family to gather? Or even to travel and get here in the first place? Are the school aged kids safe to be around the grandparents? How do you social distance or keep masks on when you’re gathering for Thanksgiving supper or Christmas morning gifts? 

What about black friday? Christmas shopping? Christmas church services? Baking day? All of your traditions that involve people, food, hugs and kisses…

Sadly, COVID19 will be playing part in our holiday happenings this year, but that doesn’t mean we won’t have opportunities to make it a beautiful, meaningful holiday season. It will be one of a kind, new territory for all – we know at least that much! 

Here’s the thing… for some of us, these aren’t new holiday complications. The COVID life isn’t so different from that of a chronic illness warrior who is sick to the extent of being homebound or even bedbound. We have always had to wear masks during flu season and avoid anyone who has been sick, even if that means skipping family gatherings or school/work. It can become an isolating time, you don’t get many visitors, it’s often just you and your caretakers, your family members, and your outings get as exciting as taking a drive on the back roads with your camera, capturing the sunset or if you’re really lucky, the bald eagle. 

So you can see how this time in quarantine has just amplified that spoonie lifestyle, and heightened the isolation, as even going to the doctors office is risky,   going to 7-11 to get a drink on the way home, running to the dollar store to get items for packages, heck, even mailing the packages is on the no list for me now. (Wear your masks, please. )

Thanksgiving can be a tough holiday to feel really involved in, really comfortable going to as a gastroparesis warrior/tubie. It is all food, the air filled with the smells of meat and pie, and there are so many loud kitchen sounds and multiple conversations going at once, lots of beautiful laughter, and oh so many forks tapping on the fine china around the table. When you are sitting at the table but are not partaking in the meal it’s hard not to become hypersensitive to all of the little noises and to be overwhelmed keep up with the conversation when you really just want to burst. Or eat. Or go in another room and just be. 

It can be difficult to adjust to being in a setting like that. For me it’s not about people eating in front of me, it’s more that it’s a holiday tradition that is suddenly stolen from you, it’s a bit different than a normal family meal or hanging out with your friends while they have a snack or whatever. This is something the whole family is doing, it’s more than a meal, it’s a celebration and a tradition, memories made, memories being talked about, but when you feel so sick and you can’t sit there any longer without getting sick, you learn to seperate yourself. 

Thanksgiving is a time to spread awareness, to encourage others to be thankful for something that everyone does all the time, so many times a day in so many settings without a thought, that has been taken from so many of us – the ability to enjoy food. The ability to be independent, to work and go to school, to live on our own…on thanksgiving, though, mostly focus on the eating :). I always encourage my readers to mention this to their family and friends on thanksgiving or any other time it pops into their minds, even just having froyo with friends or at lunch at school, whenever and wherever, take advantage of it and remind people that even the most natural parts of life can be taken out of nowhere. 

COVID19 is (hopefully) something we won’t have to alter our lives for forever. They are working hard to find a vaccine, to find an answer to get us back to real life and out of global crisis. Thank god. But for those of us with chronic conditions, we will continue having to alter holiday traditions, continue feeling out of place at times, continue wearing masks during flu season; our lives were complicated in these ways before COVID and they will be this way post COVID, but this year you have gotten a taste of our situation, and that’s something. 

Honor our struggle by not taking these limitations for granted when your COVID experience comes to a close.

Pig With a Purpose: The True Value of Pocket Change


One of my favorite and earliest childhood memories is how my dad would come home from work every day and empty his pocket change into this big, clear jar on his dresser. Slowly, that jar would fill up &  and when it started to get near empty-ing time (hardly ever did we wait till it was actually FULL), my sisters and I would add in any change from our (sad) little piggy banks and the fun began! 

For awhile we put the coins into wrappers, we learned to sort them, count them, and break them up into equal piles once they were sorted by coin type, it was a fun learning task, a fun thing we did together. After sorting we would all go to the bank and get cash. Later on, though, we found a magical new way to do things…

Suddenly we could pour the change into the AMAZING coin eating machine! This magical being somehow counted our coins and spit out a receipt that dad gave to the bank tellers and in return, they gave us… CASH!! WOOHOO! 

My dad would give each of us girls part of the pot – sometimes it was more, sometimes less. Sometimes more pennies, sometimes more quarters. Either way, we each got some money and that was so exciting. But we would also talk about how some people don’t have as much as we do, some kids don’t ever get $5,$10,$20, they don’t even get new toys or special ice cream treats or in the worst situation we could imagine the kids didn’t even have 3 meals a day or a house with enough rooms for everyone, enough beds, or heat during the winter.

My dad often bought groceries for families in need, spent time at school checking in with the kids who lacked a healthy support system at home, and he was available around the clock, 24/7 for the staff and families that worked/attended the school where he was principal. He is truly a beloved pillar in our community. I was, and still am, always so proud of him and all he does for others; he is a true inspiration. 

So even though we wanted the money for ourselves, we learned how to be empathetic and we experienced first hand that it is a HUGE GIFT to be able to GIVE. I am so thankful to have two parents who instilled this in us just by being them, just by showing  it in their day to day actions and words. They never ask for more, never complain or want, they give all they can and sometimes maybe more than that. 

I can only hope that I will be able to do so much good for others with no underlying goal for approval or recognition, simply b/c we are inspired and driven to do so. 

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If you and/or your children have a piggy bank that is awesome, if you do not have one but would like to start one, I absolutely encourage you to do so. Whether you donate or keep the funds to yourself it is a fabulous way for kids to learn about money, learn about money management or how to spend some save some, or how to be generous and donate!

If you want to donate, I can recommend a fabulous cause 😉

If your child would be interested in helping create a package for a young newbie tubie around their age they can sponsor a Newbie Tubie Care Package!

You can do this through a monetary donation or you can purchase the items to put together a package for a specific tubie based on their age & interests!

We have online wishlists via Etsy & Amazon – book wishlists, button buddy wishlists (purchase an animal for me to create a button buddy – animal with matching feeding tube), tubie essentials on Etsy, and then we have shopping guides to tell you what we include in each package, that way you have a guide to follow as you shop in person or online!

It’s an incredible gift and it means so much to our tubies, young or older, to know someone put these items together specially for them! It’s also a great experience for gift GIVER. Learning early on how great it feels to GIVE is an invaluable lesson that no amount of rolled up pennies, or even quarters, could buy, it is a “live it to learn it lesson.”

We have lots of young children & young adult tubies (mostly ranging from ages 0-36, but also older tubies) so sponsoring NewbieTubies of any age (child or adult) is welcome and SO meaningful, truly SO appreciated! You can make anonymous donations, sponsor anonymously, or you can send a card with your info so that the tubie you sponsored can get in touch if they want to do so!

I will link our wishlists and provide contact info so you can let us know if you have any questions or want to get involved in any way aside from making a donation.

Thanks for reading and share if you can! 

ETSY MUST HAVES: https://www.etsy.com/people/rsb4fc/favorites/newbie-tubies-wish-list?page=3

AMAZON:   

MAIN LIST: https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/1J7LHVRD4V3A6?ref_=wl_share

BUDDIES : https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/W9IXBH9TFV4A?ref_=wl_share

Sponsor a Book! https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/A2HGIE93P9BL?ref_=wl_share

PAY PAL: positivelyrachel101@gmail.com // VENMO positivelyrachel/positivelyrachel101@gmail.com

Shop Away, Newbie Tubie Style

Below are NewbieTubie Package shopping lists and links to our wishlists for items we are in need of right now! This list is current and we keep our wishlists updated based on supply!

We are so thankful for each and every donation, we truly cannot do this without your support and generosity! We are in need of donor support for products as well as for shipping fees to keep going, so share our posts to help us reach more donors so that our loyal followers and community don’t have to keep funding it 😉

Thank you in advance and please don’t hesitate to reach out with questions or suggestions on fundraising or other possibilities ✨

ETSY: https://www.etsy.com/people/rsb4fc/favorites/newbie-tubies-wish-list?page=3

AMAZON:   MAIN LIST: https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/1J7LHVRD4V3A6?ref_=wl_share

BUDDIES NEEDED: One fun way to get involved is to sponsor a button buddy! All you have to do is pick out a special stuffed animal we can use to create a ButtonBuddy for a special newbie

You can purchase a buddy online & add a note so we know who it is from, can share your name with the newbie (if you’d like), & can send you photos when we create the Button Buddy and send it out! 📬

https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/W9IXBH9TFV4A?ref_=wl_share

Sponsor a Book! https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/A2HGIE93P9BL?ref_=wl_share

Another fantastic donation option is purchasing a tubie-geared children’s book!

Whether they are for little tubies, little ones who have a parent, sibling, or friend with a feeding tube, or for a tubie to share with their classmates, youth groups, sports teams, etc to help normalize the idea of tube feeding and take away any feelings of fear or anxiety for both the tubie and their peers/loved ones, these books can bring so much joy, love, comfort, & self acceptance to a little tubie and their team.

Both toys and books are a way kids learn about the world & normalize, so reading about feeding tubes with young kids can make this incredibly foreign concept, meaning the tubes & the idea of “eating” through the tube on your belly – into something they are aware of, have a basic understanding of, and don’t consider to be icky or scary or weird. It’s just a feeding tube, it’s how some people eat, let’s go play now. How cool is that? Kids are truly incredible in how open they are to learning and how ready they are to accept new ideas, new experiences, how many different ways you can achieve the same goal. We should all be raised with open minds and warm, welcoming arms, we should all live to accept one another and our differences. Life is boring any other way.

PAY PAL: positivelyrachel101@gmail.com // VENMO positivelyrachel/positivelyrachel101@gmail.comi

Of course, monetary donations are always welcome and appreciated We are currently running on fumes fund wise, it keeps us from sending more packages out. So share our pages. Share your own story, that’s what people love to read. If we sent you a package, post about it! Did it make a difference? Share a photo, ask them to support & then share in honor of you✨

ShoppingList: NewbieTubies Supplies (forever changing inventory)

*TUBIE ITEMS- We always need tubie pads **, clips**, tracheostomy pads, and more! Our Etsy list is the place to go!

*BARRIER CREAMS – We need barrier creams (similar to diaper creams!) for our newbies to use – 3x antibacterial ointment and calmoseptine ex.

CHAPSTICK – We are out of chapstick and it is that season again! send us your favorite kind to share with a newbie!

FACE MASKS/Self Pampering- (Skin care masks, not surgical/COVID masks) We love including care items as well as spa/pamering items like face masks & epsom soaks and nail kits to let people do at home pampering post op! A little self care is always comforting & refreshing while recovering or admitted

FACE MASKS – AGAIN? We do love including surgical masks, so if you make cute COVID masks, send them our way!

Baby Bath & More – bath supplies, fun bath paints & crayons, fizzers, foams, etc are always great; also sponges, towels, bubble bath, and bath toys & bath books! We also use baby socks, chewies, musical fun, and all care items.

Onesies – Solid colored onesies – if you have any of these on hand or see them on sale, send them our way!

FUZZY SOCKS – who doesn’t love these? 

MINI GERM X – you can get these for 97C at Walmart as well as at any pharmacy or the dollar store! It is SO important that our recipeints have these while they heal, especially since they are having surgery during COVID19. So when you shop for yourself in person, for pickup, or online, add in a few for Newbie Tubies! Also on Amazon

Mini QTips- right by the mini germ x are mini qtip containers! We love these for every package so send them our way next time you see them! Also on amazon

Thank you to everyone who reads, shares, and donates to our efforts. You areall making a difference for someone who’s is in need of happy mail and love, so you can feel good about that. Sometimes giving feels even better than getting, and I can guarantee that this is one of those times 🙂

Button Buddies

When I was a little girl I LOVED my dolls. My first american girl doll looked just like me and I took her everywhere. We wore matching clothes and I even cut my hair to match hers (big mistake). For me, my dolls were so much more than just toys to have fun with, they brought me joy and comfort whereever I was – especially since I was so shy and often needed that “security blanket.” 

It’s not difficult to find dolls with wheelchairs, crutches, casts, glasses, even diabetic kits and dolls who are beautifully bald, but feeding tubes? No way, tubes are not good for the brand, not something kids recognize, not cool like casts that can be signed or wheelchairs that can allow you to take the special, rarely used elevator at school – yet for those who have tubes, these toys can make an incredible impact, and that is why I’m here to be their voice.

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Kevin, my “tubie friend,” has a central line & tube(s) like mine!

When I got my first feeding tube (oh so long ago), my mom made me a “button buddy” by hand and to this day, that koala, Kevin, goes with me on every long trip to the specialists, every hospital admission, and is always arms reach away when I’m not in my “safe space” or when I’m struggling to feel strong and positive about my situation. For me, my buddy represents the love and support I recieve from my mom and the rest of my family as well as the strength and perserverence I have had since getting my first tube, my first diagnosis even. Kevin has two tubes and a central line now, and he’s been a trooper through it all.

With toys like these kids are able to share about things that may otherwise be difficult for them to communicate or to understand; through play they are able to learn from one another and see all of these new things in a way that is not scary or confusing, just kids being kids – all together, blind to any differences, and every child deserves that, tubie or otherwise. 

If the buddy goes to a child with a parent who is a tubie, the child can now not only watch while their mom/dad is “eating” or doing fluids or changing the dressing, but with a buddy, the child can now participate by using the buddy to do these tasks right along side their parent! The same is true of siblings of tubies, classmates, and tubies themselves as they learn to care for their tubes and go through procedures, hospital visits, tube replacements, and feeds or medications that they have to do daily at home or inpatient. 

Button buddies allow everyone in the tubie’s life to be involved in as much of their loved one’s journey as possible in a hands on way that can help them learn and grow and understand all of the unknowns and fears they came in with. Heck, even care takers can get a practice round in on a buddy if they’re feeling anxious about how to hook up their tubie or access a line, prime out the air, etc.

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thank you AMT for the tubie bears!! what an incredible donation, I’m humbled and overjoyed.

Buddies have the ability to provide comfort beyond the normal “safety blanket” item that most have and are attached to as children, it becomes another warrior in your battle and another supporter in your journey.

The incredible thing about play is that children will take in a new toy and hardly even notice any “difference” in it, in this case they may ask what the tube is, maybe what it is for, but likely no more than that, and then it’s just another toy. There’s no judgment, no prejudice, simply children playing together, learning as they go, growing, and that in turn becomes them widening their perspective and accepting one another with no qualifications, no recognition of their differences – just as they took in their toys.

When I give a button buddy to one of our little tubies and they see that tube, the light that comes into their eyes is just incredible. Suddenly that toy & it’s very expensive piece of plastic in its tummy changes how even the “littles” themselves see the feeding tubes, how they accept their own tubes, how they accept themselves. IMG_3006

You can so clearly see  that the  button buddy – a stuffed animal –  has the power to change how these children view their tubes from being a medical device that makes them different  into a part of their body that makes them special, that their tubes are not scary or gross or something to be ashamed of. When they fell in love with their Button Buddy tube and all, they have accepted themselves – tube and all.

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My goal this year is to spread the love and the comfort that my button buddy has brought me with as many of our “newbies” as I can, and that’s all in thanks to our donors who have donated the tubes and stuffed animals or the funds for our animals and the shipping costs it takes us to send out our packages.

We’ve had incredible donations from both AMT (Applied Medical Technology, Inc.)and eSutures Medical Supply Sales, both of whom are making it possible for us to send buddies to an incredibly increased amount of tubies this year than any year past ( we are still always looking for low profile tubes) and I just can’t wait to share this with you all….

If you want to sponsor a Button Buddy you can do so by making a donation of anywhere from $12 (for just the animal) – $30 (for the button & “surgery”) – each bear is valued at $30 and shipping is $8-$15 each.

PayPal & Venmo are both @positivelyrachel.com

You can also purchase an animal and send that to us to use to create a buddy! We have an amazon list or you can pick one out on your own and ship it to us!

Here is our AMAZON Buddy link!

https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/W9IXBH9TFV4A?ref_=wl_share

Xoxo

Rachel

Strength for All; A NTCP Shirt Fundraiser

In October of 2017 I had my GJtube surgically changed into two separate tubes – a jtube and a gtube – after months of tube trouble due to my severe dysmotility throughout my GI tract. This surgery was insanely painful due to complications brought on due to my EDS, so my recovery was long painful, and during that time I relied on my parents for EVERYTHING. I couldn’t sit up in bed on my own, couldn’t walk, shower, brush my hair, or seemingly do anything else because all of these movements require abdominal contractions/tension and every time that happened I was in excruciating pain.

It was during that time that I began thinking about how lucky I was to have my 24/7 support team who were there for me always, no matter what, no complaining, and I just couldn’t bear the thought of anyone going through this alone, so I decided to be there for every tubie I could. Chronic illnesses are one of those “find out who your real friends are” situations and it can be brutal and shocking seeing who it is who puts the effort in, my goal is to step up and be that person when I can, but also to encourage others to do the same; so two years and lots of work later, over 300 packages have been sent out to first time tubies. 

To celebrate this milestone we’ve started a shirt fundraiser to raise money to contribute to Newbie Tubie Care Packages! 

Living with chronic illnesses or other conditions that cause one to be unable to eat enough to sustain themselves on their own and cause the need for a feeding tube is incredibly challenging, and that’s a massive understatement. Imagine life without your favorite foods , without the ability to go out for ice cream or coffee or a drink with friends, not sitting around the table and eating thanksgiving with your loved ones, having to come up with options not involving food for social gatherings or first dates, and explaining to people why you aren’t eating or what that little knobby thing on your tummy is.

Feeding tubes require incredible strength and self awareness, they are life changing, but they are nothing to be ashamed of, they are a gift that gives life back to more people than you would ever imagine – young and old, boys and girls, and due to so many different causes or conditions, feeding tubes are so much more than just a life sustaining piece of plastic, so join us in spreading awareness and celebrating year 2 of Newbie Tubies as well as the gift that so many of us are given through feeding tubes – the gift of nutrition, energy, and a life we may not have had without them.

Whether you’re a tubie or not, purchasing a shirt shows your support and love for tubies and contributes to our care package program that sends packages (free of cost) to first time tubies. No matter where your strength comes from, these shirts represent that strength.

We run on donations and these shirts are super cute, so it’s a win-win! You do not have to be a tubie to be Tubie Strong!  Purchase a shirt for yourself and wear it proudly, no shame, just strength and power in your self and appreciation for the gifts we often take for granted.

Thank you so much <3

*Link below! Currently open until Nov. 21st.*

**SHOP HERE!**

you can also donate to PayPal @ rajinone@aol.com or check out or wishlists on Amazon or Etsy!

Love & Gratitude,

Positively Rachel

The Myth of Malnutrition

Lets talk malnutrition. 

Malnutrition is one of the most misunderstood medical concepts; it’s complicated and can present itself in so many different situations and with differentiating signs and symptoms in different people. When you hear malnutrition you probably think of pre-me infants with failure to thrive, kids in africa, or people caught in blizzards on Mt. K, right? The extremes? 

What you don’t usually think of is 16 -30year old females who have previously led healthy, active lives but all of a sudden stop processing food. And then there are the little kids, 3-8 year olds who just cannot absorb nutrition and gain weight and strength like they need to be doing at that age for developement. Can you imagine? Most of these people end up on tube feeds or IV nutrition in order to get nutrition and hydration, in order to stay alive. 

Another myth about malnutrition is that you must be skinny if you’re malnourised. I mean if you can’t eat you lose weight right? No brainer. But no, that’s not how it always works. The body can do one of two things when you are malnourished, it either begins eating away at any extra fat cells you have and then eventually turns to muscle as well, leaving you skinny, weak, and easily dizzy, clumsy, tired, and in pain, OR your metabolism shuts down and you begin packing on ANYTHING possible, any sugars, carbs, liquids, etc. are stored as fat and you begin gaining weight even if you hardly take in 200-1000calories a day.

Being a “gainer” as they say can be extremely difficult both physically and emotionally. You aren’t eating, you aren’t getting to enjoy your favorite foods, yet you’re packing on weight with no explanation. It’s unfair, it’s uncomfortable, and it’s often extremely difficult to turn around, nearly impossible to reverse no matter how hard you try, no matter how much you exercise or how little sugars or carbs you take in. 

People who are not educated on this topic don’t always take people seriously about their nutritional level if they are not underweight. They must be lying if they are gaining right? Wrong. Our bodies are just different, and we may not know exactly why, but it happens, and that’s a fact, not a myth.

 

Mindful Impact

Mindfulness. It is just amazing how big of an impact our thoughts can have on our bodies, on our ability to heal. It’s important that you fill your mind with optimistic or positive, healthy thoughts and your life with all of the things that have always brought you joy, all of your hobbies, and the people who put a smile on your face.

Today’s technologies allow for incredible connections; there is a huge online presence of “spoonies” (as we call ourselves) all over instagram and facebook, both individual pages and group pages! This resource is a HUGE gift to those of us who suffer from severe illnesses that leave us homebound or bed bound with little to no social interaction, but there are cons to this as well.

When you surround yourself with individuals who are sick, and you are sick and have been for a long time, it begins to feel normal. You start to forget what it feels like to be healthy, to be a functional, productive person. When you start to feel that way you know it’s time to reevaluate your perspective, remind yourself of what makes you feel like YOU. Not sick you, not healthy you, but YOU.

Be mindful, know your limits physically and mentally. Will all of these posts from other sick chicks –  some of them trending towards competitive over who is worse off, some who seem to thrive off of the attention from being sick – make you focus too much on the sickness? Does life revolve around illness? Because it doesn’t have to; no matter how sick you are, you are more than your illness.

There’s a lot more to mindfulness than this, but it’s a start. I encourage you all to focus not on your illnesses, not on symptoms and treatments and bad doctor visits, not of scary unknowns and dooming diagnoses, but on all of the aspects of your life that were there before illnesses, that exist independently from illness, that bring you simple pleasure, joy, distraction, love. Positivity. Light.

When Life Gives You Limes

People often use the expression, “when life gives you lemons” when things aren’t going quite right, you’re likely familiar with the phrase? Well, humor me as I explain why I’d like to adapt the statement to, “when life gives you limes.”

In my opinion, lemons are tasty and you can do so much with them, many options being super simple! For example, of course you can make lemonade, then there is lemon cake, lemon bread, lemon cookies, pie, and more! I mean lemons are great for tea, detoxing, or simply put in your water. Lemons are just so handy, but limes? Limes are a little bit more complicated, they’re slightly more sour and although you can use them in drinks and recipes, it’s not quite as common, kind of like chronic illnesses – complex and uncommon.

That said, I have quite a few limes in my life. I’ve been diagnosed with over 10 chronic illnesses, a handful of which are seriously debilitating and progressive. I’ve had to take medical leave from the school of my dreams, now having watched my classmates graduate without me, and put my future goals on hold. Because of my symptoms– mostly nausea, pain, and fatigue– most days I am not even able to leave home and I spend majority of my time in my bed resting and sleeping.

I have new limes thrown at me every time a doctor gives me a new diagnosis, every time a treatment doesn’t work, and every time I wake up feeling worse than I did the day before. However, I’ve learned to take these limes and use them to help me find all of the gifts in life, all of the things that I am so thankful for. When you’re given challenges, sour moments, it really teaches you to be so much more thankful for every little moment or object that makes you feel joy.

Some of the sweet things in my life that regularly help me get through the sour moments include my dogs, Baxter & Dexter, my family, good music, and my online support network. There are also little gifts day to day like a 75 degree day, a special visitor or getting something in the mail, being able to take a walk, an Epsom salt bath, taking a drive and seeing pretty scenery, etc. Lots of small things bring me joy, and I am so appreciative of every happy moment I am given.

I’ve had a lot of curveball limes recently, broken tubes, line infections, flare ups of pain and nausea, exhaustion, and doctor troubles to name a few, but I’ve learned to put up walls that keep all of this from affecting me too much, only allowing through the smallest amounts of stress or worry possible – the last thing I need on top of my illness happenings? Extra limes.

Learning to filter out some of the extra stressors, even the smallest things you may hardly notice can make a big difference in the long run. Hold on to every happy moment, every simple pleasure, and let go of negative energy; hold no grudges, and never go to bed or leave your loved ones angry. Forgive, love, laugh, and remember not to waste precious time on trivial issues. When life gives you limes, take a moment to find your own sweet moments and happy thoughts, play your favorite song or cuddle with your dog, text your best friend or your mom, take time to express yourself, share your love and gratitude, spread the joy in random acts of kindness, random words of affection. Life is too short to be sour.

 

Medical Madness: Survival of the Introvert

I’ve always been a bit of an introvert, my parents often tell me that when I was young, my teachers said I hardly spoke a word, I was polite and hardworking, but quiet as a mouse, which my parents thought was odd since I often talked a lot at home J I’m shy and often have trouble making friends, I have always hated confrontation or having people be upset with me. I worry about running late or being in the wrong place at the wrong time… I’ve got a lot of thoughts and opinions and knowledge, but being introverted and having trouble sticking up for myself in tense or questionable situations, it can be a major downfall when you’re living like I do.

Getting sick at such a young age with conditions that so many doctors don’t even know about let alone know how to treat. Since I was young and still living at home, my parents were always with me at doctors appointments – still are today J — and they were able to help me express things fully and ask all of the questions I needed to, ask for help with whatever needed more attention, but I still often got overwhelmed.

Being sick so long I’ve begun running my doctors into retirement, and of course with that comes the need to begin the draining search for new doctors, a task that brings difficulties in many ways. You’d think that after almost 8 years I would be able to do this on my own, to handle doctors and keep focused and calm and get everything out of it that I need, but that’s just not the case. You never know what you’re walking into with new doctors; each has their own protocols for testing and treatments, they believe in different approaches, and you have to explain your history in detail, which gets longer each time.

There are so many biases against girls like me with “invisible illnesses” simply because of my age, gender, and appearance, and the worst part is that those biases and judgments don’t just come from stupid high school kids or young adults, they come from doctors, from insurance, from pharmacies, from all of those who are supposed to be the ones making my life, making my body at least feel a bit more comfortable, a bit more active, a bit more NORMAL.

After a few bad experiences with doctors and nurses and hospitalists, some being members of my own care team, the medical professionals who hold my life in their hands, and that kind of brutal betrayal can lead patients like myself to extreme anxieties and even medical PTSD, which makes finding new doctors a terrible thought, a stressful time for me, and on top of that, I have to be brave enough to get through these appointments feeling like I’m in good hands.

Doctors are supposed to “do no harm,” but that concept is flawed and misinterpreted sometimes; “do no harm” isn’t a pledge meant just to protect us from doctors intentionally causing harm, doing things to make us sick or cause us pain, etc., it means do all you can to help your patients no matter who they are and what they have. There’s so much that happens behind the scenes of the medical system, doctors with prejudices who feel they have a right to be rude and judgmental and negligent when we know something is going on and we are asking for help. Negligence is a crime just as serious as purposeful, physical harm.

Why do you get to decide what I’m feeling, what the symptoms or side effects can or cannot be based on a decade old case study instead of putting trust into the patients, the ones living this, the ones suffering every day while the professionals get to wash their hands and go home without another thought of how their actions or lack there of are affecting us. I may not be a medical professional, but I am definitely a chronic illness expert, and if doctors could truly understand that, we could work together, creating trust and mutual respect.

A wise woman once told me that I need to remember that doctors work for patients. I think doctors forget that and take advantage of their position and their capabilities, the things that only they can do or get their hands on. We need doctors, we need the resources they can give us, but they need us, too, and they need to keep in mind that those of us with chronic illnesses aren’t your average patient, and we know our stuff.  No one knows chronic illnesses better than the patients themselves.

Since there are no options for spoonies to join the medical field based on our personal knowledge and research, it would be incredibly beneficial if our doctors and insurance agencies and dieticians, pharmacists, etc. would take us seriously and use our advice, consult with us more so than just making the decision and saying that’s that.

We do so much of the work, so much of the research, and all of the first hand experience, yet we still rely on the “professionals” who are making these decisions without listening to the answers we are offering.

Adventures of Mummy & Her Little Tubie

I’m excited to share a post written by one of our Newbie Tubie Mamas who is the mama of a little tubie and agreed to share a bit of her journey with us! This is a great opportunity to read a bit about raising a tubie from the perspective of the mother…

“There were times I’d sit and wonder how the hell we were going to get through this, how can we live like this forever not being able to feed our baby who’s starving and also failing to thrive anyway so needs every bit of milk he can get.

Our little man is now 8 months and has all of his nutrition via a feeding tube. Some days your baby’s screaming for milk and you can’t feed him because you can’t get the right aspirate – this could take us hours. It does get easier I promise!

I’m very lucky my husband is amazing with our children. He’s definitely the more practical thinker and I go into full research mode and sit and think what if. I have managed to tone down the googling – my husband made me promise I’d only google it if the doctor had spoken about it or it was in one of his reports and that really does help. Your then looking at specific information rather than a whole load of case stories of children who have completely different medical histories. I do find that being prepared helps my mental health, but only if I’m preparing for the real thing, not something from google that ends up being way far off from what’s really going on.

It also helps that he’s a very hands on Dad so I know when I’m in hospital with our youngest that the others are safe and happy at home with their Dad who also manages to keep the house going while I’m away. They spend lots of time visiting us because at the moment they’d rather be with us at the hospital but when the time comes that they don’t want to do that anymore we will be respectful of this and put other plans in place.

Our children have been amazing, they find it really tough and it’s so important to remember that this isn’t easy on them, either. They’re young, but they see the complexity, they see when we are upset, they want to know, so we tell them what’s happening but also try and keep their lives as normal as you can. We try and make sure they get to all their clubs, they have friends for tea or we get them on days out as we would have done before.

Siblings are a great gift to our tubie, but we have to make sure that each child feels loved, appreciated, and individually important to us and to everyone. Each one makes a huge difference, is an inspiration, a source of strength and light and joy.

During feeds it can be difficult to pick your baby up without messing up the pump, kinking the tubing, or making your baby uncomfortable from the feeds, and as caretakers, moms especially, all you want to do is hold that sweet baby! There are often extra steps when doing these basic, instinctual habits, and when you’re a parents, that can be extremely frustrating and disheartening. Eventually, the medical supplies falling out of all of your closets and the tasks that come with tubes and chronic illnesses become part of your daily routines, it all just becomes second nature – scary thought, right?

It’s all about finding the right mindset, but you first have to almost grieve the life you thought you were going to have with your new baby. I cried for hours that I would loose that bond by holding him to feed him; I can assure you I was worrying over nothing our bond is stronger than ever! We still get plenty of cuddle time and when he’s feeding I’ll often sit next to his cot and hold his hand, play peekaboo or tickle him. There are lots of opportunities for bonding you just have to look for them.

I woke up one day and realized this was our life and we’ve got two choices we get on with it, build our little man up and hope one day he stops aspirating or we sit and sulk about it which gets you absolutely nowhere! Life doesn’t stop for a feeding tube, feeding tubes allow life to get going again, it allows children to BE children, it is just another way to feed your little one.”

-Hayley Smith

If you have any interest in guest posting, I’m always happy to share different perspectives and pieces from fellow writers 🙂 Email me/contact me through the blog if you want to talk about it 🙂