Chronic Fatigue Battles Adrenaline

So I am gonna go out on a limb here – I feel like it is probably safe to say that we have all heard or said the phrase, “I’m too tired to sleep,” right?

If you have not heard it or you don’t know what the heck it means, just keep reading and I think you’ll understand by the end of my post! If you don’t, feel free to ask 🙂

One of the worst, but most commonly understood struggles that comes with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Dysautonomia/POTS is when you wake up from a “solid” nights sleep and you still feel exhausted. You have a full day ahead of you with no energy? I mean, does anyone else feel like you have energy when you don’t need it but are lacking when you need it most?

Chronic fatigue is a really difficult condition to live with. It almost always shows itself as daytime fatigue – chronic fatigue, duh right? Okay, but that absolutely does not mean you are guaranteed a solids night sleep just because you are exhausted, right? Duh! You can have chronic fatigue and sleep all day and night and still be physically and mentally exhausted. You can sleep all day and be awake all night, and not by choice, not because you’re out partying or staying up watching movies and eating ice cream, but laying bed in the dark, exhausted and trying to sleep…

Fifth grade. I was in fifth grade when my insomnia came to life, so I’m a pro by now. I also have hypersomnia, something most haven’t heard of but essentially, I’m exhausted all the time and require regular rest, often times a nap or two throughout the day, & on my bad days, I am sleeping more than I’m awake. What really complicates things for me is the hypersensitivities, adrenaline rushes and narcoleptic spells.

Majority of the time I am extremely fatigued, mind and body, but there are times when I am feeling such exhaustion paired with severe pain and whether it be due to pain, fatigue, or medication, I slip into an adrenaline rush that takes me from 0-100 in the snap of your fingers. These adrenaline rushes most often hit when I’m in a state of physical and mental fatigue & exhaustion and are in no way healthy, pure energy –  it does not come after a good nights sleep or a killer cat nap, it doesn’t occur when I have plans made and am looking forward to that, it is a surge of adrenaline that hits at any time, lasts who knows how long and sometimes, for what feels like a minutes time, masks my exertion, distracts from the pain, and allows me to have a little, tiny taste of the energetic, alert, and active person I was before I got so sick.

You know those anxiety driven dreams we have about showing up naked to school or tripping and falling in front of a new crush? Well, in the life of a spoonie, those dreams come true! I have had more than my share of awkward hangout happenstance, with both old friends and new friends, most of the latter never having asked to hang out again. I’ve fallen asleep at a bar, in someone’s car, had to take IV meds plenty of times, plus just telling people about it all is always kinda awkward since people don’t know how to react, but basically every “get to know you” question leaves me with a blank if I am trying to avoid talking about my health situation, so it’s better to be up front about it than to try and make things up. I have yet to try to go on an actual date with a guy I might like since getting so sick, but if it’s anything like making new friends, I think I will hold off for awhile on that.

I am often able to be up and about and even get more done during one of these rushes; I definitely communicate more, sometimes talking fast and nonstop, rambling on about who knows what and driving my family crazy, which can be a hint I am having one. Though annoying, I think my parents sometimes enjoy my less than legit bursts of energy b/c I am more like my pre-illness self when I’m hyped up, so yes, we know they aren’t “normal” energy but what about me is normal? 

The challenging thing about this is that these rushes can last 30 minutes or 3 hours, but once it’s over, it’s over and I crash HARD and FAST. When I go down, I go down, and depending on what I used that “functional time” for, I often require a day or two of recovery time. Usually, though, it is so worth it.

That said, I’m thankful to be having less and less narcotic episodes – I am almost 6 months “clean,” aka no longer falling asleep standing up or mid sentence. I have found a couple medications and lifestyle routines that help allow me some sense of freedom or independence since I’m not being babysat 24/7 – I have plenty of photos of myself sleeping in different locations thanks to my family members who like to send them to one another. I have my little tricks for revitalizing and also know what symptoms to look out for and when it’s time to cut a social visit off before having it spiral into “no second hangout” zone. I’m ready to go.

Being sick for so long and going through so many surgeries, procedures, tubes and lines and changes in my body I just don’t have a great self confidence, I’m uncomfortable in my body physically and mentally, it doesn’t feel like MY body. I was a fit athlete, a healthy eater, I spent hours at the gym every day before I got sick, and now I have so little control over my body and it’s not easy. I have to remind myself that I am worthy and able, that I enjoy every outing I say yes to, that meeting new people has been fun, even if, for whatever reason, we only hang out once.

The world can be an intimidating place when you are isolated from it for so long. It’s not easy to navigate as a medically unique introvert who leads a very unusual life, but if you just look past that and into who I am, I’m really not any different. I may have a unique perspective on things and a pretty open schedule, but that’s about it 😉 Oh, and I won’t eat your left overs, heck, I’ll cook for you and still not eat your left overs 🙂 Who can beat that?

I want so badly to be part of the real world, but my body is fighting so hard every step of the way, almost as if it has a mind of its own and wants me all to itself. It’s an every day battle, all I want is for my mind and body to be one, to feel like one, to function like one, to be a full person, a whole woman again.

So even those short periods of relief from pain and the unpredictable, short-lived bursts of adrenaline have the ability to give me a taste of the world, a taste of life, a taste of ME. Not sick me, not poor Rachel, not anything aside from just being ME. It reminds me that there is a life out there that I am fighting for, that my life outside of illness is worth fighting for…

I WILL find my way back to being just Rachel.

Until then,

xoxo

Tips for Tubies: Tubie Love & Acceptance

I never could have imagined needing a feeding tube at 18 years old, and now, at 22 years old, I am still relying on my tube(s) — now I have two tubes and a central line. I’ve had tubes for so long and learned so much that now I’m able to teach others about them! My life took a huge change in direction when my health took a turn for the worst and had my tube placed; suddenly I was experiencing so many changes in my lifestyle and my body. I began to feel like I had zero control over my own body, and everything I had planned for my life, my future, began to slip away with every day, month, year, that my illnesses progressed. My feeding tubes took a little while to get used to, physically and mentally, because they cause bloating, they stick out through certain clothes, and they can leak and be kinda gross…but they also saved my life.

Learning to love your feeding tubes as well as yourself, both your body and your lifestyle, can be a challenge at first…I struggled for a long time to find confidence and acceptance of both my body and my tubes, I still struggle almost every day to pick out a shirt that doesn’t hug my tubes or my central line too tight or pants with a waistline that doesn’t hit my jtube… it’s not easy to feel confident when you feel like you’re the only one who looks like this, the only one with tubes, alone in the journey you’re facing.. my goal is to help others feel less alone.

Here are a few of my tips for adjusting to tube life and learning to accept the tubes as well as all of the way those tubes affect you, your body, and your lifestyle..

 

1. It can be hard adjusting to tube feeding and not feeling in control of your own body, but you should never feel ashamed of the tubes or the changes they can bring to your body. These tubes keep you alive every day. It may take time to come to accepting this addition to your body, and that’s absolutely okay, totally normal; but always remember that health comes first!

2. You get a feeding tube to restore your body and increase both strength and energy. Feeding tubes may be a bit of a pain, but they are meant to give you your life back, not take it away. Never give up on your dreams or your goals, although everyone’s healing times are different, and we all have different underlying causes/conditions, feeding tubes themselves don’t need to be looked at as a disability or a limitation; in fact, for many, they are the opposite.

3. Trying to eat while you’re a tubie is not anything to be ashamed of, and it does not invalidate your need for your tubes. Many people (with tubes) have a couple “safe foods” or still drink liquids, some can only suck on a piece of candy here or there, but either way, food or no food, you are still you, and only you know your body. If you can tolerate any oral intake and your doctor is okay with it, attempting to keep your system “awake” even with an occasional, tiny snack can be good and in no way invalidates your need for a tube.

4. Try to stay social! Being so sick and having a surgery like this often leaves one feeling exhausted, worn out both physically and mentally from the pain and inability to care for ones self; when getting out of bed is a painful challenge and showering takes more energy than was stored up for a whole week, it’s easy to get discouraged . Getting dressed and going out takes a ton of energy, but it is so good to get out, it’s too easy to become isolated! Friends will only take rejection so many times before they stop asking to hang out; even just suggesting a movie night or spa day at home is a great option to see friends, make plans, but not use as much energy. Your health comes first, but part of taking care of yourself means taking care of your mental/emotional health too, and having a healthy social life and support network is so important during times like these.

5. Feeling down in the dumps? During recovery and during challenging times throughout your journey it is so easy to slip into a “chronic illness mindset,”  which essentially means that to some degree, many have a time of feeling a loss and grievance over a “pre-illness” self, a self that can begin to disappear when illness takes over and we lose some of our abilities to function in the “normal” ways, or in the “normal,” functioning world.

If you sense yourself falling into one of these times, I highly suggest finding a way to remind yourself of your goals, your dreams, yourself. Try creating a vision board, definitely one of my favorite ways to remind myself of where I was before illness and where I want to go now, what I want to do in my future, and all of the things past, present, and future that give me hope and motivation. Just begin by thinking of all of your goals and dreams, even the totally unrealistic ones (being a mermaid, traveling the world in 30 days, learning to fly, etc.), and cut out pictures and words and quotes in bright, bold photos or lettering and then make a collage on cardboard or a tack board, heck put it on your wall if you want!  Hang it in a place where you spend the most time and allow it to encourage happy thoughts and positive thinking 🙂

I know people saying “mind over matter” and “just think positively, distract yourself” can be really frustrating or degrading, but positivity really is important if you want to make it through these transition periods and through your journey with chronic illnesses in general.

 

I plan to continue with more tips soon as well as some personal experiences with tubes, both good and bad 🙂 I am also going to be making a new vision board, and I will post a guide of how I did it when I can 🙂

Thanks for reading, don’t forget to check out the tubie items & artwork in the shop! Every purchase supports the Newbie Tubie Project, enabling us to send out another package & help another tubie adjust to life with tubes.

xoxo

 

 

** i am not a medical professional, just an experienced tubie sharing my experiences as well as those of other tubies who help me compile information to help inform others about what “tubie life” is like and how to make the best of it 🙂 Please consult your physicians before changing any medical treatments/procedures.