My Opiate Crisis

The opiate crisis. Two words, so much baggage.

I think it’s reasonable to say that most individuals over the age of 15 living in the US today have at least heard something about the opiate crisis. Opiates are bad. Narcotics are addictive. They ruin lives and have a high risk for overdose. Opiates are a gateway drug and lead to use of street drugs & illegal self-medicating. (5th-10th grade health class, yah?) That’s what we learn about the opiate crisis, bad bad bad.

Opiates/narcotics can be dangerous…if used incorrectly or illegally. But for people like me, who are living with multiple chronic pain conditions, this opiate crisis is affecting our treatment plans and more importantly, our quality of life & ability to function.

That said, and all dramatics & sarcasm aside, for those of us living with chronic illnesses, the opiate crisis is not the same crisis that you hear about in the news or in a doctor’s office…

My opioid crisis involves trying to make the very limited quantity of pain medication last the whole month, every month….

and then I have to trek back to the doctor to try to advocate for myself and my needs when a change in dosage or medication is needed– I’m really shy/bad at confrontation and in person advocacy so this is a big stress for me.

My opioid crisis is struggling to make each dose last long enough; dealing with a connective tissue condition and genetics that make my body metabolize pain medications too quickly has made treating my pain very hard, high doses of pain meds are hard to get with all of the new FDA laws that are in place due to recreational users and ODs, which of course have nothing to do with my case, but laws are laws and now it’s been made my crisis, your crisis, and that of every addict or legal pain patient who uses these meds.

My opioid crisis involves choosing between being able to function during the day or being able to sleep at night. I’m an artist and a writer, but I can’t paint or write because of the pain in my hands, wrists, and arms. I can’t stand too long, sit still, or lay down without having severe pain in my back and hips. When does the pain end? What is more important, sleep or being productive and (semi)functional during the day?

My crisis means facing the consequences of others’ actions; I don’t abuse drugs nor do I purchase them illegally or without a prescription. I use pain meds because I am unable to really live without having a way to try to manage the pain, no different than how I work to manage my nausea or my migraines, any of my symptoms that can affect my quality of life.

My opioid crisis may not be “normal,” but it’s real. I know so many other girls going through these trials, we are lucky to have each other, but the stress and the guilt and the disappointment from disappointing doctors and failed treatments or lack of access to medications can be overwhelming. There are no words to explain how deeply the system can affect us– and not just because of opiates.

I would love to find something aside from narcotics that would relieve my pain effectively. I want to paint for hours with no shooting pains in my arms, hands, or back, and I want to type without my wrists feeling like they’re black and blue with bruises every time they hit the laptop/keyboard. I want to sleep all night and run a full bag of tube feeds without waking up in too much pain to sit up.

I don’t want to be on narcotics. I have so many goals, and none of them include narcotics, but they also don’t include severe, widespread joint and nerve pain. I also understand why there are strict rules on medications like narcotics. I wouldn’t want them to be easily available to everyone. But that doesn’t mean that those who are truly, legitimately suffering– whether it be acute (post op, injury, car wreck) or chronic (fibromyalgia, arthritis, ehlers danlos syndrome, CRPS, etc.)– should have to continue to suffer when there are actually medications that could make a difference!

Not all of my conditions have treatments. Not all of my symptoms can be managed. So if I find something that helps, and I have doctors saying it makes sense, why does it have to be so damn hard to get a hold of these medications? This system is just mind boggling sometimes.

I want to be a person, not a patient, not a statistic in a research study, just Rachel.

That’s a glimpse at my opiate crisis.

 

Recovery and Discovery: A New Idea

My recovery process from having my new feeding tube placed (switching from a GJ to two separate tubes, a g and a j tube) has been really challenging. Due to some surgical complications and my connective tissue disorder, healing has been difficult and I’m still in a lot of pain. I’m lucky, though, because I have an amazing support team at home who are here for me and care for me no matter how long it takes; not everyone has that.

Because I’ve been having such a rough time healing and I’ve been in bed for so much of the last 4 weeks I’ve had a lot of time to think; through the online support communities I’ve seen so many people go through these diagnoses and tube placements alone. I just can’t stand to think of how terrible it must be to have to be your own support system in times like this; for two weeks I couldn’t even get out of bed or walk on my own, I still can’t bathe on my own or prep all my meds, feeds, and fluids. I’m dependent on my parents for almost everything, for individuals who have to have tubes placed and don’t have support systems and don’t know much about feeding tubes (who does if you’ve never had one, been on the online pages, or had a loved one with one?), this can be an extremely scary and challenging adjustment.

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My support system 😉

What I’ve decided to do is start an organization/nonprofit that sends packages to new tubies—people who are getting their first feeding tube placed—so that we can give them some comfort and some of the “tubie essentials” to get started with. This would include things like tubie pads, microwaveable heating pads, cute masks, pill crushers/sorters, journals to write symptoms in, allergen free, natural soaps, bath bombs, etc. I’ve compiled a list with more products, but we are looking for anything comforting for someone who just came out of a tube surgery (no food!).

Right now, this project is in the “just a dream/just getting started” period as we try to find people willing to donate products to our cause. We are asking small, spoonie geared businesses as well as local businesses who make things like soaps, hats, blankets, etc. So, if you have any interest or know someone who might, please let me know! There’s absolutely no pressure to donate, though!

I will also be putting the profits from my paintings into this project (once I turn a profit!), so if you’re interested in looking at my art, please do! It’s posted on my blog in the lifestyle section under “My Art” 🙂

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I wanted to share this with you all as it will be something I’m working on a lot for now, so I’ll try to keep you posted! This is a way for me to help others and be productive while hardly leaving my room—as long as we find donors! So thank you so much for reading and I can’t wait to see where this is next time I update you!