Desensitized to The Diagnosis

Yesterday I got a new diagnosis. But in all honesty, a new diagnosis doesn’t phase me much anymore. When I was 16 I got my first diagnosis, Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), but I had no idea that 5 years later I would have more diagnoses than I can count on both hands.

In 2016 I was diagnosed with Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, a genetic condition that affects connective tissue and collagen in your body. For me, this diagnosis explained a lot. I had already been diagnosed with Dysautnomia/POTS/NCS as well as Gastroparesis and generalized dysmotility in my colon and intestines. I had been struggling with unexplained chronic joint and nerve pain and I finally had an answer; although EDS wasn’t an easy answer and it meant I will likely never be completely free of illness, I finally had answers.

You probably won’t understand this unless you’re chronically ill, but after receiving that diagnosis, the ones that followed haven’t been surprising to hear or hard to accept. EDS has a lot of co-morbid conditions, and as mine has progressed and as I’ve seen more specialists, I’ve collected a nice array of conditions. Because I know my illness and understand what it can cause, I’m prepared for all of the co-morbid conditions it can bring on.

It’s never good news when I get another diagnosis, but I like to think that a diagnosis simply means we are moving forward towards treatments and answers, it doesn’t actually change anything symptom wise. I’m the same as I was before the diagnosis, I just have more answers and another syndrome/condition on my records. Usually a diagnosis actually brings me more relief because doctors actually start treating a conditions once it has a label and is no longer just unexplained symptoms.

I don’t mean to minimize the severity or seriousness of chronic illness; every illness I have I take very seriously and we treat each to the best of our ability. But after being sick for so, so long and being diagnosed with so many things, there is a desensitization to the process. Maybe it’s a protective mechanism, a coping mechanism, or maybe it’s just because it becomes your life, but just because I’m progressively ill doesn’t mean I have to let each diagnosis set me back.

Happy Birthday, Mom!

I’ve always been told that I’m a lot like my mom. We are both strong willed (maybe stubborn), hardworking, and loving women. My mom is more free spirited and outgoing than I am and loves to be spontaneous; while I tend to like to have a plan, she’s always up for adventure. Although I’m slightly more “rational” as we put it, we both always look for the positive in the situations we are in and help each other hold on to hope.

I am so blessed to have a mother who not only went above and beyond in my childhood but who continues to care for me today– in my adulthood! Not everyone is lucky enough to have even half of that.

My mom goes above and beyond each day to help me and my sisters be as healthy and as happy as we can. She works a full time job and parents full time for 3 of us! Having a grown child who is as sick as I am is more than a full time job in itself, yet she manages a job and my sisters as well. Of course having a wonderful husband and father helps, too 🙂

Although my mom never planned for it, she has become my at home nurse. She overcame her squeamish side and learned how to change a port needle, prep feeds and fluids, handle all of my feeding tube supplies, deal with my fainting, and so much more. She’s incredible.

My mom is also one of the strongest women I know, both emotionally and physically! Neither one of us is great with expressing ourselves emotionally, but she’s been through so much yet remains so strong. She supports me and the rest of our family through everything and always advocates for us without hesitation.

I could go on and on about my mom and all of the amazing things she does, but this is a post to celebrate her birthday! So, happy birthday, Mom! I hope your day is fabulous. I love you so much. I wouldn’t be able to do this without you. Thank you for fighting beside me every day❤

Why I Sometimes Choose not to Listen to my Body

When you’re sick for a long period of time, you become very in tune with your body. I’ve learned how to listen to its cues and I can often tell what kind of day I’m going to have or when certain symptoms are escalating and I can then plan my day accordingly. However, I’ve also learned that sometimes it’s okay to hear my body out and then choose not to listen to it.

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A recent outing to visit a friend who has alpacas! One of my favorite animals 🙂

Right now I’m at a point in my illness where I don’t get many great days. I have days that are less symptomatic, sure. But every day I’m experiencing pain, severe nausea, migraines, and fatigue. I spend most of my time in bed, sleeping all night and much of the day. I am often pretty uncomfortable when I am up and moving around.

That said, when I get the opportunity to do something fun, sometimes I have to tell my body that I don’t care what it thinks, I’m just going to do it. For instance, my dad got 2 free tickets to the UVA basketball game this weekend and my little sister, who is a huge fan, couldn’t go. Obviously, I love UVA basketball, but events like that aren’t easy for me to attend. This is something that my dad and I used to love to do together and I haven’t been to a game since I was in school there two years ago, so I decided to fight my body and take advantage of the opportunity.

I’ve been in a flare up all week because it was an antibiotic treatment week and those always take a lot out of me. Because I’m low energy and high needs, preparation for me to go on an outing like this takes a lot more time and planning than it does for most people. I showered the night before because I always have to nap after showers—they exhaust me and always leave me with a migraine. When I woke up on Saturday morning (for the first time) I did a bag of IV fluids and did my morning meds a few hours earlier than normal because they make me sick to my stomach. I took three different nausea meds by 8:00am and made the final decision that I was going to go with Dad to the game. I stayed in bed finishing my tube feeds and trying to rest and control my pain/nausea until about 11am—the game was at 2pm.

As I said, for me, this game is a huge outing. So, I had to take enough nausea medication to last me at least 6 hours, pain medication, migraine meds, and all of the other supplies that go along with my tube and port. I also take sunglasses and a mask for the car because of my light sensitivity, a heating pad, lidocaine patches on my back and my stomach, and lots of germ-x! I’m nearly 21 years old, but packing me up for a day trip is comparable to packing up a baby’s diaper bag, just swap diapers and toys for medical paraphernalia.

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Yay! We made it!

I love getting out and doing things that I loved doing before I got sick, but as you can see, it is quite a process now. Going to this game will likely land me in bed for days recovering from using so much energy and being so over stimulated, but being there reminded me how much love I have for UVA and getting out and having quality time with my dad that wasn’t a road trip to a doctors appointment was such a gift. I’m blessed to have a family that works hard to help me be able to have fun outings like this every now and then.

Some days, chronic illnesses just don’t get to win.