Delivery Day

Ice ice everywhere! Our first bout of winter weather came to town this week, and it was enough for two snow (ice) days for the kiddos, pretty much the most exciting thing back then. Sadly, I’m no longer an exited 6year old whose biggest worry is whether or not there will be school tomorrow, and though I still love waking up to a winter wonderland, snow days are a lot different for me now.

I live in the woods, and my driveway is a gravel mountain itself, so when the weather is bad, we are often stuck here for as long as the ice is. This ice storm came through on a Wednesday night/Thursday, which of course, with my luck, is the day my medical supplies are sent out (Wednesday) and delivered (Thursday). I rely on all of these supplies to stay alive and out of the hospital. My entire week’s worth of food (tube feeds), hydration (IV saline), and the medications and supplies that are vital for keeping me going are in one, very heavy, box.

My home health/ pharmacy does everything they can to make things run smoothly, but they can’t/won’t send packages early, so during a winter weather storm like this, things can easily get lost or delayed. I received an email from my pharmacy saying the supplies hadn’t gone out on time and weren’t able to be delivered on Thursday, so it became a question of how long would it be until our driveway would be passable, giving us the chance to go and others to come.

That said, it doesn’t necessarily all ride on them, my network goes much further that that, and in ways some may not have ever thought to take time for Before. I received an unknown call on Thursday, and I was surprised when it was my delivery driver from FedEx! He called me to let me know he wasn’t running his route today due to the weather and the road conditions, but he saw my box and knowing how important it is, he called me personally to see if there was any way for him to get it to me. So even though he wasn’t working his normal delivery route, he took time to call and was ready to put forth effort to get that box – filled with those important medications and fluids to me in any way we could. How incredible is that? Just the offer was so genuine and an incredible inspiration, a true member of my team.

I guess I shouldn’t be too surprised, because this isn’t the first time I’ve had interactions with him—always positive ones. This man has always been incredibly kind to me. I’m almost always home alone during the day, he sees me hooked up to my IV pole and a total mess lookin’ straight out of bed, always trying to control my crazy dogs, but no matter what the chaos is, he is always smiling and helpful. You don’t come along delivery drivers who are always ready to do more, to push the job requirements and just be compassionate and accommodating, but anytime he sees an opportunity to be helpful, he is there.

Putting for that effort without being asked to is such an incredible gesture, I know not everyone would do that. I feel incredibly grateful to have such caring and empathetic people in my life, even someone who just knows I’m young and sick and get weekly medical supplies. There’s no limit to who can share and spread love and support, and I couldn’t ask for a better reminder of that. There are so many members of my medical “team,” and you probably don’t automatically consider a delivery driver to be a key member, but in bad weather, lost boxes, damaged product, etc., you better believe that these individuals are key to your treatments, your well-being.

In a time during which I am feeling a bit lost when it comes to doctors and support (aside from my fabulous parents <3), having these individuals who really do care and put forth such effort is an incredible blessing. This week I was reminded of that, reminded to appreciate everyone who puts forth effort into my journey, some of whom don’t even know they are participating while others are doing work behind the scenes that I don’t know about.

I urge you all to think about each member of your team, including all of your (kind/helpful) nurses, the x-ray /IR techs, and your pharmacy or delivery service, home health, etc. Think it through, make a list if you are as forgetful as I am. And then let them know you’re feeling appreciative! Bake cookies or write a thank you card, you never know who might be in need of a little appreciation.

Spread the love, and never underestimate the impact someone can have or how much just one small act of kindness can change the course of someone’s day.

 

Must Haves for Tubies: A Guide to All of Your Tubie Essentials

Preparing for your first feeding tube? Or just adjusting to life with tubes? Here are some tips about some tubie essentials!

**always talk to your doctors when changing/adapting any parts of your treatment plan, my posts are strictly personal experience/personal research– I am not a medical expert, aside from my years of illness 😉

Gauze and/or Tubie pads—

Gauze and tubie pads serve the same purpose, they keep the tube site (aka the stoma) clean and dry, soaking up all excess drainage and keeping all outside gunk away! Some tubies have more drainage or granulation tissue while others hardly have any at all after the stoma heals from surgery; if you have a lot of it, continuously, gauze is often (not always) the best option. Tubie pads are much cuter and don’t require tape, making them easier on the skin. Some people use both, many people develop a preference as to which one they use, but either is a solid option for keeping your stoma clean and “happy.”

 

Great places for tubie pads (& great donors for newbie tubies!):

Homemade Tubie Happiness (on Facebook or Etsy)

Tubie Whoobies (Facebook)

Dorky Little Etsy Store (Etsy)

 

Syringes

 You’ll use syringes every day, you have to flush during and after feeds to keep your tube from clogging and many tubies take medications through the tubes, using syringes.

You can get various sizes and types of syringes, anything from a 1-3ml syringe (not used for tubes as much as for central lines), to 10ml, 30ml, and 60ml syringes. Luer lock syringes have smaller tips that can have needles screwed into them; they work best for flushing water/feeds through and the smaller ones can push clogs through. Slip tip/luer slip syringes have longer tips that are better for medications as they allow the dissolved meds pass through easier and leave less behind.

Your home health company should provide syringes, but if they don’t have the kind you like or don’t give you enough, you can buy mass quantities for cheap prices online.

 

Qtips, clean wash clothes, natural soaps

Keeping the tube(s) clean and dry is SO important. Change the gauze multiple times a day and pay attention to the stoma—clean gently with a warm, wet qtip when changing the dressing and wash with a cloth & natural soaps during your showers/baths/etc.

Don’t leave excess blood or drainage on the skin, it can cause irritations, itching, or pain. Some drainage and blood is normal, though. It’s no reason to panic.

 

Tapes/adhesives

 There are many types of tapes and adhesive bandages, as you go along you’ll figure out which best suits you! Your infusion/home health company should provide you with tape, but if they don’t or you don’t like what they give you, there is tape in any pharmacy or any store that has a health section.

Paper tape, transpore, or medipore tape are two of the easiest on the skin, but paper tape doesn’t last as long or stick as well and it is not water proof. It may take some trial and error, but you will figure out which works best, and if you use tubie pads you won’t need as much tape!

You should get tape from your home health/infusion company, but if not you can find it online or at the pharmacy.

 

Stoma creams/ointments—

Your tube site, aka your stoma, may cause you discomfort on and off even when it has healed. There are a lot of options for ways to try and minimize discomfort. You should ask your doctor before changing any part of your treatment plan, but these are some options to talk about…

Itching? Hydrocortisone cream, Benadryl cream

Pain? Lidocaine ointment

Skin irritation, granulation tissue, or bile burn? Try granulotion, calmoseptine, sudocrem, or any other barrier cream your doctor recommend

All of these items can be found on Amazon, at a pharmacy, or from your doctor…

 

Tubie belts, button covers, and tube clips

Along with tubie pads, you can get tubie belts and button or port covers that are especially helpful for children with feeding tube. Belts and covers help keep the tubes still and in place while being used or while not being used so that kids are less likely to mess with/pull on their tubes and cause harm to their tubes or themselves

The tubie clips help keep the extra tubing from dragging or getting caught on things when you are feeding on the go. These clips work well with backpacks and/or IV poles, whatever suits you. They’re cute and simple but can save you from yanking your tube out by accidentally stepping on it or getting it caught while moving around.

All of these items can be found on Etsy, a few of the best shops to find these?

Tubie clips: Crafting for a Cure Co. (They support Newbie tubies with their sales!)

Belts: Kangarootique (Etsy)

Heating pads

Heating pads help with pain, nausea, bloating, and so much more. You can get electric heating pads or microwavable ones. They come in all shapes, sizes, and patterns and you can get them anywhere– amazon, walmart, any pharmacy, or etsy.

One of my favorite Etsy shops and one of Newbie Tubies largest donors: Divine Comfort Rice Pks

Tubie Awareness Gear:

 Be loud & proud about being a tubie; there is no shame in having a feeding tube. There are so many cute shirts, bags, and accessories that help being a tubie be a little more glamorous. Don’t be afraid to let others know about your tube, awareness and confidence are important, and you never know who else may be out there with a tube hidden under their shirt, too?

A few places to find cute tubie apparel:

Tubie Love Gear: http://feedingtubeawareness.bigcartel.com/

Newbie Tubies: instagram @ newbietubies and/or positivelyrachel.com

 

Hopefully this information was helpful! For more, check out our tips list or visit my good friend, Carolanne’s blog, here for more information on tubie products!

Tips for Tubies: Tubie Love & Acceptance

I never could have imagined needing a feeding tube at 18 years old, and now, at 22 years old, I am still relying on my tube(s) — now I have two tubes and a central line. I’ve had tubes for so long and learned so much that now I’m able to teach others about them! My life took a huge change in direction when my health took a turn for the worst and had my tube placed; suddenly I was experiencing so many changes in my lifestyle and my body. I began to feel like I had zero control over my own body, and everything I had planned for my life, my future, began to slip away with every day, month, year, that my illnesses progressed. My feeding tubes took a little while to get used to, physically and mentally, because they cause bloating, they stick out through certain clothes, and they can leak and be kinda gross…but they also saved my life.

Learning to love your feeding tubes as well as yourself, both your body and your lifestyle, can be a challenge at first…I struggled for a long time to find confidence and acceptance of both my body and my tubes, I still struggle almost every day to pick out a shirt that doesn’t hug my tubes or my central line too tight or pants with a waistline that doesn’t hit my jtube… it’s not easy to feel confident when you feel like you’re the only one who looks like this, the only one with tubes, alone in the journey you’re facing.. my goal is to help others feel less alone.

Here are a few of my tips for adjusting to tube life and learning to accept the tubes as well as all of the way those tubes affect you, your body, and your lifestyle..

 

1. It can be hard adjusting to tube feeding and not feeling in control of your own body, but you should never feel ashamed of the tubes or the changes they can bring to your body. These tubes keep you alive every day. It may take time to come to accepting this addition to your body, and that’s absolutely okay, totally normal; but always remember that health comes first!

2. You get a feeding tube to restore your body and increase both strength and energy. Feeding tubes may be a bit of a pain, but they are meant to give you your life back, not take it away. Never give up on your dreams or your goals, although everyone’s healing times are different, and we all have different underlying causes/conditions, feeding tubes themselves don’t need to be looked at as a disability or a limitation; in fact, for many, they are the opposite.

3. Trying to eat while you’re a tubie is not anything to be ashamed of, and it does not invalidate your need for your tubes. Many people (with tubes) have a couple “safe foods” or still drink liquids, some can only suck on a piece of candy here or there, but either way, food or no food, you are still you, and only you know your body. If you can tolerate any oral intake and your doctor is okay with it, attempting to keep your system “awake” even with an occasional, tiny snack can be good and in no way invalidates your need for a tube.

4. Try to stay social! Being so sick and having a surgery like this often leaves one feeling exhausted, worn out both physically and mentally from the pain and inability to care for ones self; when getting out of bed is a painful challenge and showering takes more energy than was stored up for a whole week, it’s easy to get discouraged . Getting dressed and going out takes a ton of energy, but it is so good to get out, it’s too easy to become isolated! Friends will only take rejection so many times before they stop asking to hang out; even just suggesting a movie night or spa day at home is a great option to see friends, make plans, but not use as much energy. Your health comes first, but part of taking care of yourself means taking care of your mental/emotional health too, and having a healthy social life and support network is so important during times like these.

5. Feeling down in the dumps? During recovery and during challenging times throughout your journey it is so easy to slip into a “chronic illness mindset,”  which essentially means that to some degree, many have a time of feeling a loss and grievance over a “pre-illness” self, a self that can begin to disappear when illness takes over and we lose some of our abilities to function in the “normal” ways, or in the “normal,” functioning world.

If you sense yourself falling into one of these times, I highly suggest finding a way to remind yourself of your goals, your dreams, yourself. Try creating a vision board, definitely one of my favorite ways to remind myself of where I was before illness and where I want to go now, what I want to do in my future, and all of the things past, present, and future that give me hope and motivation. Just begin by thinking of all of your goals and dreams, even the totally unrealistic ones (being a mermaid, traveling the world in 30 days, learning to fly, etc.), and cut out pictures and words and quotes in bright, bold photos or lettering and then make a collage on cardboard or a tack board, heck put it on your wall if you want!  Hang it in a place where you spend the most time and allow it to encourage happy thoughts and positive thinking 🙂

I know people saying “mind over matter” and “just think positively, distract yourself” can be really frustrating or degrading, but positivity really is important if you want to make it through these transition periods and through your journey with chronic illnesses in general.

 

I plan to continue with more tips soon as well as some personal experiences with tubes, both good and bad 🙂 I am also going to be making a new vision board, and I will post a guide of how I did it when I can 🙂

Thanks for reading, don’t forget to check out the tubie items & artwork in the shop! Every purchase supports the Newbie Tubie Project, enabling us to send out another package & help another tubie adjust to life with tubes.

xoxo

 

 

** i am not a medical professional, just an experienced tubie sharing my experiences as well as those of other tubies who help me compile information to help inform others about what “tubie life” is like and how to make the best of it 🙂 Please consult your physicians before changing any medical treatments/procedures.

Tips for Tubies: A Tubie’s Guide To Success Vol. 1

 

  1. The doctors work for YOU. Not the other way around. If a doctor (or a nurse, tech, or anyone else in the medical system) treats you with any less respect or dignity than you deserve, consider finding a new specialist.
  2. No question is a bad question. There are awkward questions and there can be a boatload of questions, but all of them are important. Ask until you’re satisfied, even if the doctor is acting rushed or distracted. Your health and confidence is more important than anything else.
  3. Some surgeons aren’t big talkers – they like to get the job done; make a list of questions and concerns and make sure to ask them the first time you see them pre-op/post-op or during your follow ups, it could be the only time you see them!
  4. Recovery can be even more challenging than surgery itself. Have people who will be around to help you or at least set up some people to come visit and check on you each day. Before surgery, set up a place by your bed or couch where you can keep some essential items so you won’t have to get up and down every time you need something.
  5. Don’t push yourself! There are no “shoulds” with chronic illnesses or tube feeding. If recovery is taking longer than planned, take some time off from school or work if you are able to! Learn that it is okay to say no when your friends want to go out to eat or get drinks late on a Friday night, if you feel cruddy or just don’t want to be around food, it’s okay to stay in or suggest a different plan. No guilt.
  6. Learn to advocate for yourself. It can be hard to really get doctors to understand what you truly feel and then to get what you need to be comfortable. Be persistent and thorough in explaining symptoms and how it affects your life. If you aren’t good at being forward, take a parent, spouse, relative, or friend who can help make sure everything gets covered.

 

These are just a few of the major tips for getting started with “tube life,” but they’re applicable throughout the journey with feeding tubes and really with any chronic illness. Learning to manage your case, advocate for yourself, and stay on top of appointments/doctors, questions, and treatments both past and present can be a big task, but staying organized and figuring out early on what methods work best for you to manage it all is really beneficial in the long run.

Keep your eyes out for more tips, the next round will be more tubie-specific regarding tube care and what to look out for vs what not to get freaked out over! 🙂

Thanks for reading and  I hope it was helpful! If you have questions or suggestions don’t hesitate to comment or message me!

 

 

8 Myths About Feeding Tubes

Most people will go through life without ever having to deal with a feeding tube; they won’t have one themselves nor will they have a loved one with one. However, there are over 300,000 people living in just the USA who have feeding tubes—this includes children and adults of all ages and varying conditions.

A lot of people don’t know anything about feeding tubes and some have the wrong idea about them, so as part of Feeding Tube Awareness Week, I want to clear up a few myths and give you some information about living with a feeding tube.

MYTHS ABOUT FEEDING TUBES:

  1. Feeding tubes are only given to people who are dying.

Majority of people who have feeding tubes are actually using them to survive! Our feeding tubes give us the nourishment we need to function. Yes, you often see them on TV keeping comatose patients alive until they are taken off of life support and sometimes cancer patients or high risk premies have them, but, more often than not, they are given to people who need supplemental feeding or full feeds to continue living. Some babies use them starting as newborns and are on them for their whole lives while others only need them temporarily, and some people get them later in life when a medical condition causes them to be unable to consume nutrients on their own.

  1. Feeding tubes are only for people who are underweight.

I have gastroparesis and generalized gastrointestinal dysmotility – my stomach and intestines do not process food—and yes, I am underweight. That said, some people with the same condition gain weight due to their bodies going into starvation mode and hanging onto every calorie while converting sugar and carbs into fat. You can be overweight and malnourished. That is a medical fact. There are also lots of individuals out there who have swallowing disorders, food allergies, and other conditions that make them not have enough oral intake, but again they do not necessarily have to be underweight, they may just not get in key nutrients, proteins, fiber, fats, etc. No matter what your weight, you need adequate nutrition, so yes, no matter what your weight, you can require a feeding tube when not able to intake adequate nutrition orally.

  1. When you have a feeding tube you can’t eat.

Many people who have feeding tubes are only in need of supplemental feeding, meaning they eat orally, but not enough to stay fully nourished, so they do feeds just to cover what isn’t taken in orally. You can still eat when you have a feeding tube. There are many people who have restricted diets or are only able to take in liquids and require more nutrition via tube and then there are others who cannot eat at all. Even people with gastroparesis sometimes have a “safe food” or two that they can tolerate in small amounts, or they’re able to suck on candy, drink some gingerale, etc. It doesn’t invalidate anyone’s need for a tube, each tubie and their doctor figure out the best individual plan for tubie needs.

  1. Only babies and the elderly need feeding tubes.

A lot of people think of preemies and the elderly when they think of feeding tubes. In reality, there are an endless number of conditions that can cause a temporary or permanent need for a feeding tube. Some of these conditions are prematurity or failure to thrive, neurological or neuromuscular conditions, cancer, digestive disorders (like gastroparesis), Down syndrome, swallowing conditions, eating disorders, and many more! People of all ages, genders, sizes, sexualities, races, and health histories can have feeding tubes. You can also have a tube for only a few months, a few years, or you can need one permanently. Each person’s journey is unique.

  1. Feeding tubes are a scary, bad thing.

People often think of tubes as being scary or bad, but to many of us they are what give us our life back. Being malnourished and dehydrated all the time is exhausting and dangerous, so having a feeding tube that allows you to stay nourished and get some energy and strength back is such a relief. No, it is not an easy thing and it is not what most of us want or ever imagined for ourselves, but it is a lot better than starving to death, which is what would happen to many of us (myself included) without the tubes.

  1. Feeding tubes are an easy fix.

Feeding tubes are a lot of work and they aren’t an easy answer for a lot of us. I can only speak from personal experience as someone who got her tube as a young adult with a chronic gastrointestinal condition, but my tubes have caused many trials and tears, lots of pain, and little weight gain, but I am alive and I can’t confidently say I would be here without the tubes. This past year I went from one tube (a GJ) to two separate tubes (a Jtube and a Gtube), that surgery was complicated and recovery was brutal, Ive been in immense pain for most of the last 4 months since surgery. The body doesn’t always like having foreign bodies permanently lodged into your organs.

7. Feeding tubes put an end to your symptoms

A lot of people think that once someone with a digestive condition, or other conditions that cause malnutrition, get their tubes, they start to feel automatic relief from symptoms. Tubes are incredibly helpful and they do help many people get to a point where they can function at a much more “normal” level as their nutrition and energy levels improve. That said, many of us still deal with daily symptoms like nausea, pain, bloating, constipation and/or diarrhea, vomiting, fatigue, etc. Living with feeding tubes is only part of the treatment for many of us; they are life saving, but they aren’t the only treatment or the cure to those of us who have chronic conditions that cause us to need them.

8. You don’t experience hunger when you have feeding tubes.

Many people with feeding tubes still experience some degree of “hunger pains,” some have true hunger while others are experiencing spasms that mimic hunger, but it’s normal to feel hunger when you aren’t filling your stomach up with solid foods all day. There are so many conditions that can require use of a feeding tube, some of them have nothing to do with the function of the stomach (food allergies, swallowing conditions, FTT, eating disorders, etc.) so these patients are much more likely to feed into their stomachs (gtubes). They are also likely to experience hunger between feeds. Individuals with conditions like gastroparesis (stomach paralysis) and other digestive conditions may feed into their intestine, skipping the stomach completely. Some of these individuals experience hunger while others do not. Tube feeds do not always stop hunger and definitely don’t stop cravings. Some days it can be hard to avoid “real people” food.

 

Life with a feeding tube is not easy, but they are life saving and I wouldn’t be here without mine.  Feeding tubes are nothing to be ashamed of, if you have a tube, be proud. Advocate and spread awareness for yourself and for your fellow tubies.

I hope I covered all of the basics, but if you have anymore questions please don’t hesitate to ask! Feeding Tube Awareness Week is all about spreading awareness, sharing knowledge to help work towards more research and answers for the future, and supporting one another, tubie or not 🙂

 

Keep following the blog this week for more posts on Feeding Tube Awareness Week as well as a special video and information on how you can help the Newbie Tubies Project!