Brain Fog

So I haven’t posted a blog in a couple of weeks and although I’m sure in this busy season of life most of you haven’t even noticed, I decided to give you an idea as to why it is that I haven’t been posting.

The last few weeks – or really the last couple of months—have been really challenging for me health wise. Winter has always been my worst season, especially for my gastroparesis. I’ve been spending anywhere from 16-22 hours in bed every day, my pain and nausea levels have been through the roof, and I’ve been having migraines literally every day.

Aside from being in a major flare up of all of my physical symptoms, I’ve been struggling big time with my brain fog; that’s what I want to talk about today. When I tell people I have this elusive symptom called “brain fog,” they often just blow it off and think I simply mean I’m tired, lazy, or forgetful. But brain fog is a real symptom of my condition(s) and it has seriously affected my life since getting sick.

The medical term for brain fog is cognitive impairment. The most common symptom, and the one I struggle with the most, is difficulty with word finding. Essentially, I know exactly what I want to say but I have no idea what words to use to say it. I forget simple words used to form sentences, names of objects, places, and even names of people. I often have trouble forming sentences and finishing thoughts. This makes holding a conversation — or writing a blog! — very difficult at times.

Other symptoms of brain fog include short-term memory loss, decreased concentration, and fatigue especially after mental exertion. For example, when I am reading a book I often find that I have no idea what the page I just read said. Although I’m sure that many people find they have this problem, its not because I was day dreaming or because I don’t like my book, its just because my fatigue and my fuzzy brain can’t keep up. I also couldn’t tell you the name of the book I’m reading right now if my life depended on it nor could I tell you the names of my favorite movies, books, or often even my favorite actors or authors.

These symptoms make school extremely difficult for me and for many other patients who live with POTS and other conditions that cause brain fog. Imagine trying to write an essay (hopefully you can find words in your fuzzy head) on a book you can hardly even remember reading. It again also makes conversations hard because when people ask me simple questions like, “Who’s your favorite actor?” or “What movies have you watched recently?” I often have no good answer for them when I’m put on the spot.

A few of the other symptoms of brain fog include difficulty multitasking, blurred vision, headaches, and difficulty working with numbers. Not everyone has all of the symptoms and there are others I didn’t mention, but now you have a general idea! Research states that up to 96% of patients with my form of Dysautonomia have brain fog.

My brain fog gets worse on days when I’m more fatigued or have over exerted myself (which doesn’t take much!). It is also made worse by certain medications that have side effects like drowsiness or lightheadedness. When I’m tired and having a conversation with someone who doesn’t know about my condition and how it affects my ability to find words, I can get extremely flustered and overwhelmed.

I used to be extremely articulate and I had a great vocabulary so it can be weird for me to talk to someone who knew me before I got sick because they often aren’t aware of how my condition affects that part of my brain. Brain fog is an extremely frustrating symptom of Dysautonomia and it is so much more debilitating than one might think. I know my brain function is in there somewhere, but it often hides and doesn’t work as well as I’d like it to.

I’ve learned to cope with brain fog, but it has taught me that you can be robbed of any part of yourself at any point in life, whether it be your vocabulary, your ability to form sentences, your memory, your ability to consume food, your ability to walk, your ability to see, etc. There are a million things we take for granted each day, and the only time you will truly start to look back on it is when you lose one of these things.

I know I say it all the time, but I continue to encourage you to take nothing for granted and love others unconditionally. Don’t judge someone before you know their story. Brain fog is a real symptom and it affects me every day. Many people don’t believe that, but that’s just because they’ve never walked a day in the life of someone living with it.

 

 

 

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positivelyrachel

My name is Rachel and I'm a 21 year old living with multiple chronic illnesses. My illnesses have completely my life, but they have also taught me so much about life and about myself. Although I am currently unable to attend school, I am enjoying writing and spreading awareness about these illnesses. I also love spending time with my family, cuddling with my dogs, cooking, and (attempting) to paint! I hope you enjoy reading :)

One thought on “Brain Fog”

  1. I’ve had brain fog. I went through a time when I could describe an object but not find the word in my brain. Mostly, that has gone. Still have other fog. I have FM & CF, diabetes, low thyroid; My labs say I’m healthy. My body disagrees. I find that any barometric changes causes more pain and fatigue.

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