A “Non-Hallmark” Christmas

Let me start by saying that I love Christmas. I’m one of those people who is ready to start baking Christmas cookies and watching Christmas movies right after Thanksgiving (much to the dismay of my sisters 😉 ). The whole season just seems so… jolly! I love seeing people light up with holiday spirit; it just seems to bring out the best in people.

This holiday season I feel incredibly blessed in so many ways. We recently moved into a beautiful new home on an amazing piece of property. Although I sometimes miss our old house, I love living in the woods and our new home is so accommodating to my needs with my illnesses as well as the needs of my family.

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The new house!

I’m also so thankful for my family who continues to be by my side through my toughest times. I could (and probably will) write a whole blog post about how amazing my family is, but for now I’ll just say that I literally wouldn’t be here today without them.

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My family (minus one!) in NYC last Christmas! That trip just about did me in, but it was so fun!

I’m thankful for all sources of warmth—my home, my bed, my heating pads, my hats and coats, and all my fuzzy blankets. Of course I’m thankful for my dog, Baxter who keeps me company every day and brings so much joy to my life! And I am thankful to have good health insurance and a great set of doctors working with me to find a good treatment plan as my health continues to be a challenge. The list goes on, but the general idea is that I’m overwhelmed with gratitude during this holiday season.

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Little man in his Christmas sweater 🙂

That said, even though I love Christmas and I feel blessed to have so much to be thankful for this holiday season, over the years I have also come to understand that not everyone has a perfect “Hallmark Christmas.” Many of us are plagued by illness, loss of a loved one, poverty, family discord, and other things that may affect our holidays.

This will be my 4th Christmas living with severe chronic illnesses. My illnesses never keep me from having a joyful Christmas, but they do affect how I get to celebrate. My day won’t consist of eating Christmas brunch or Christmas dinner with my family, there won’t be any sweet treats in my stocking, and I won’t be running around outside or wrestling with my cousins like I used to do or sitting and sipping wine with my aunts and grandma.

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My delicious (not) Christmas dinner! At least my pole is festive 🙂

This time of year is actually when my illnesses tend to be at their worst. My pain levels are high, my nausea is relentless and completely overtakes me at times, I have daily migraines, and many days I’m asleep more than I’m awake. I’m incredibly thankful that this year I have the means to stay at home and out of the hospital for the holidays by relying on my feeding tube and my port (a central line in my chest that acts as a long term IV) to stay hydrated and get in enough nutrients to ride this flare through.

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Pretty much me right now.

My Christmas Day will include IV saline, tube feeds, nausea and pain medication, and napping in place of breakfast casseroles, eggnog, cookies, and snowball fights, but that doesn’t mean I won’t love it. My family helps make Christmas special for me every year; it may not be ideal, and it may not include any Christmas miracles, but I have so much I am thankful for and I will have so much to enjoy on Christmas day.

 

Not everyone has a perfect “Hallmark Christmas,” but that’s okay. Celebrate as much or as little as you are able. Celebrate in what ways make you happy. Take care of yourself this holiday season and help others do the same.

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Having these illnesses has really widened my perspective. It is important to keep in mind that not everyone has a perfect holiday as we go about celebrating this season. The holidays are a time of joy, love, generosity, and gratitude and it is so important that we keep that in mind as we share this time with our loved ones as well as with those we may not know as well. Not everyone is full of holiday cheer, and that isn’t a crime. I encourage you to always give people the benefit of the doubt and simply spread love this holiday season.

 

 

 

Published by

positivelyrachel

My name is Rachel and I'm a 21 year old living with multiple chronic illnesses. My illnesses have completely my life, but they have also taught me so much about life and about myself. Although I am currently unable to attend school, I am enjoying writing and spreading awareness about these illnesses. I also love spending time with my family, cuddling with my dogs, cooking, and (attempting) to paint! I hope you enjoy reading :)

One thought on “A “Non-Hallmark” Christmas”

  1. I love this! It puts such a positive spin on the hardships of holidays with chronic illness. While many of us will never have a hallmark Christmas, it is good to remember all that we do have, and should be thankful for.

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